JEEP POWER STEER­ING SWAP

Jp Magazine - - News - Sources Ad­vance Adapters, 800/3502223, ad­vanceadapters.com Herm The Over­drive Guy, 360/256-3843, hermtheover­driveguy.com JEGS High Per­for­mance Parts, 800/345-4545, jegs.com Pure Choice Mo­tor­sports, 888/505-8355, pure­choice­mo­tor­sports.com

Here is the whole sys­tem hooked up, tested, and ready to rock. A lit­tle cleanup and paint on the power steer­ing pump and it looked like new. A drive­belt for the pump was sourced from a 1976 Buick Sky­lark with a 231 V-6, Mas­ter Pro part num­ber 7370 from O’Reilly Auto Parts. The steer­ing shaft was a per­fect fit with a smooth ro­ta­tion thanks to the uni­ver­sal joints. A lit­tle re­assem­bly of the fender, and the Jeep project is done. There’s more than one way to do ev­ery­thing, es­pe­cially some­thing cus­tom like this power steer­ing box mount. John Cappa also used a Sag­i­naw power steer­ing box on his flat­fender, but in­stead of fab­ri­cat­ing a plate, he welded tubes to the frame to mount the steer­ing box. AN-6 fit­tings and hose were also used for the high-pres­sure line, along with a ba­sic 11⁄16-18 to AN-6 adapter for the steer­ing box and an el­bow. Our friend RJ used the Ad­vance Adapters weld-on bracket to mount the Sag­i­naw steer­ing box to his CJ-3A frame. He was able to have a local snow­plow parts dealer form him power steer­ing lines that were routed through a strate­gic hole cut in the grille. This bracket takes some of the fab­ri­ca­tion time out of a power steer­ing swap, but re­quires a welder who knows how to weld cast iron ef­fec­tively. If you want power steer­ing but don’t want a steer­ing box vis­i­ble on the front of your Jeep, you have op­tions too. You can use a Ford re­verse-ro­ta­tion steer­ing box along with one of Herm The Over­drive Guy’s mount­ing bracket and pit­man arm kit. The box mounts be­hind the front cross­mem­ber and be­hind the grille, out of sight. This Jeep is out­fit­ted with a Chevy 4.3 Vortec V-6 and uses the fac­tory power steer­ing pump on the motor. From the out­side the Jeep looks like it hasn’t been mod­i­fied. This is an ex­am­ple of a high-mount Buick power steer­ing pump that is a lit­tle more com­mon, at least in the junk­yards I pick through. This style is needed on a Buick motor to use the Ford re­verse ro­ta­tion steer­ing box and still have room for the hy­draulic lines to fit. Some of you may rec­og­nize this iconic Jeep as the Killer Bee Jeep. This Jeep’s steer­ing box is a hy­brid com­pi­la­tion of a Scout box stuffed with dif­fer­ent in­ter­nals. This par­tic­u­lar box is also set up for hy­draulic ram as­sist. The box is mounted way out in front of the Jeep to ac­com­mo­date the front wheel­base stretch. The owner, Ned Ba­con, said that in all of the years that box has been mounted there he has never had a prob­lem smash­ing it on the rocks. Our buddy Sammy Siev­ert’s tricked-out CJ-2A is out­fit­ted with a steer­ing box from a Jeep

TJ. It was mounted up high so that the steer­ing shaft would clear the front cross­mem­ber with­out hav­ing to cut a hole in it, and so the pit­man arm was up and out of harm’s way.

The grille did need a lit­tle trim­ming though. He made a cus­tom bracket for the Chevy 350 un­der the hood to mount a com­pact power steer­ing pump out of a Nis­san Al­tima. A hose shop was able to sil­ver sol­der the fac­tory TJ and Al­tima hard lines into a high-pres­sure flex hose to link them to­gether.

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