SEXY EDC

KIZLYAR’S SUPREME WHISPER FEATURES EL­E­MENTS OF 3 CUL­TURES

Knives Illustrated - - News - BY TIM STETZER

Do the math. Three great cul­tures come to­gether to bring the best of each into one amaz­ing EDC folder with the Kizlyar Supreme Whisper.

Amer­i­can de­sign. Ja­panese in­flu­ence. Rus­sian man­u­fac­tur­ing. Blend these three cul­tures, and the re­sult is one amaz­ing EDC knife. Ev­ery­day carry knives get used for a myr­iad of mun­dane daily tasks, in­clud­ing open­ing boxes, cut­ting twine, and slic­ing up ap­ples or your sand­wich for lunch. They don’t have to be sexy to be func­tional. But then again, we live in the golden age of per­sonal cut­lery with more choices avail­able to us than ever, so there’s also no rea­son they can’t be sexy and still be ex­tremely prac­ti­cal at the same time … such as the Kizlyar Supreme Whisper from CAS Ibe­ria.

The Whisper

Kizlyar Supreme has es­tab­lished it­self as a top-qual­ity man­u­fac­turer with a sta­ble of very good do­mes­tic de­sign­ers from their home base in Rus­sia. Through a col­lab­o­ra­tion with CAS Ibe­ria, they’ve worked with Amer­i­can knife de­signer, Ja­son Bree­den, to come up with a truly in­ter­na­tional de­sign in a Far East, meets East, meets West way.

Ja­son’s Whisper is heav­ily in­flu­enced by Ja­panese de­sign and chan­nels the tra­di­tional tanto in its blade shape and han­dle cues. Rather than the an­gu­lar Western tanto, the Whisper uses the more gen­tly curved tra­di­tional tip profile that is time-proven for its strength and penetrating power.

De­spite the his­tor­i­cal blade profile, the ma­te­ri­als are com­pletely mod­ern. It features a tough, re­silient D2 tool steel blade with a black ti­ta­nium coat­ing for added dura­bil­ity and cor­ro­sion re­sis­tance. The Whisper uses a high, flat grind on its 3.75-inch-long blade and has a set of dual thumb studs, mounted for am­bidex­trous, one­handed open­ing. The ac­tion is smooth, and—with a lit­tle prac­tice—the blade is eas­ily snapped open with just the flick of the thumb.

Lock up is han­dled via a well-cen­tered liner lock, and there is no no­tice­able play in the blade when opened. A sub­tle cutout in the left scale makes it easy to ac­cess the liner lock to re­lease and close the blade. The D2 blade is mounted to the han­dle via a sturdy pivot pin with stylish heads that look like shuriken.

The Whisper’s han­dle is milled from black and red G-10 in a di­a­mond pat­tern rem­i­nis­cent of the Ja­panese han­dle wrap­ping used on tra­di­tional katanas, wak­iza­shis and tan­tos. A ba­sic black ver­sion is avail­able as well, if the two-tone red and black aren’t to your taste. The G-10 is backed by a set of stain­less lin­ers for added strength. The Whisper uses an open-frame de­sign to make it easy to clean and to keep crud from build­ing up. A non­re­versible, deep carry pocket clip is set up for right-hand, tip-up carry. The clip is skele­tonized and features a Ja­panese mon, or fam­ily crest, at its end, which is an­other nice de­tail and nod to the blade’s his­tor­i­cal in­flu­ence.

“… THE WHISPER USES THE MORE GEN­TLY CURVED TRA­DI­TIONAL TIP PROFILE THAT IS TIME-PROVEN FOR ITS STRENGTH AND PENETRATING POWER.”

I’m not one to keep boxes, but I must say that the Whisper comes packed in one of the nicer boxes I’ve seen. It’s a sturdy black card­board af­fair taste­fully adorned with the Kizlyar Supreme logo and con­tact in­for­ma­tion, which is in gold. The flap is se­cured by a mag­netic latch, and the knife is safely nes­tled in a foam cutout and ac­com­pa­nied by a warranty card that ex­plains Kizlyar’s life­time warranty in both English and Rus­sian. The MSRP for the CAS Ibe­ria is $112.

The Whisper Day to Day

To get a good grasp on how it car­ries and how it works in a va­ri­ety of en­vi­ron­ments, I car­ried the Whisper off and on, both at work and home, over a cou­ple-month pe­riod. Although in my work as a po­lice of­fi­cer, most of my knife use is the same as any­one else’s— ba­sic util­ity tasks—i al­ways do keep in mind that a blade could be put into

play as a last-ditch de­fense weapon or to aid in weapons re­ten­tion. With that on mind, I usu­ally carry my knife in my left-rear pocket, op­po­site of my duty weapon. I found the Whisper worked quite well in this po­si­tion. Its deep carry clip kept it dis­creet and se­cure, and its flat profile made it com­fort­able to carry. The profile of the clip made it slide over the edge of the pocket eas­ily and had enough re­ten­tion to stay in place but not so much that it made it hard to draw. The sym­met­ri­cal han­dle de­sign and am­bidex­trous thumb studs made it as easy to use with my off hand as my pri­mary, which isn’t al­ways the case with knives I try. As far as de­fense use goes, I can’t say I got into any knife fights while I was car­ry­ing the Whisper … or at all for that mat­ter. With that said, when look­ing at the Whisper from that stand­point, it has some great features in its fa­vor. The di­a­mond pat­tern G-10 han­dles pro­vide a solid grip, even when wet. They do a nice job of keep­ing your hand in place so that it doesn’t ride up on the blade when stab­bing, even with­out the pres­ence of any sort of

“THROUGH A COL­LAB­O­RA­TION WITH CAS IBE­RIA, THEY’VE WORKED WITH AMER­I­CAN KNIFE DE­SIGNER, JA­SON BREE­DEN, TO COME UP WITH A TRULY IN­TER­NA­TIONAL DE­SIGN IN A FAR EAST, MEETS EAST, MEETS WEST WAY.”

guard. They also pro­vided enough tex- ture so that it worked well in a gloved hand. The good sized 4.5-inch-long han­dle is com­fort­able in both saber and ice pick grips, in ei­ther the edge-in or edge-out po­si­tion. The tanto point gave good pen­e­tra­tion on stacked card­board test tar­gets, even when punch­ing through lay­ers of denim and leather to sim­u­late heavy cloth­ing.

The bulk of my work with the Whisper was day-to-day tasks, and it shouldn’t be any sur­prise to hear that it per­formed these quite well. With its easy draw and fast one-hand open­ing, it was con­ve­nient to de­ploy for quick mun­dane chores like open­ing the steady stream of pack­ages and Ama­zon boxes that I seem to get, as well as cut­ting cord and rope, trim­ming strings and the like. I got a num­ber of com­pli­ments on the de­sign, even from nonknife folks. It’s a good-look­ing de­sign that tran­scends knife en­thu­si­asts. I like the long 3.75-inch blade and flat grind for im­promptu kitchen chores. It did a great job of dic­ing up ap­ples, and it had enough length to hand­ily slice bagels and cut up subs and hoa­gies. The open-frame de­sign made it easy to clean up be­fore and af­ter food prep.

Over­all func­tion and prac­ti­cal­ity on the Whisper was ex­cel­lent, and I found the combo of G-10 han­dles and D2 blade held up nicely un­der use. The only mi­nor is­sues I noted dur­ing use were that while the fac­tory edge on the Whisper was good, it wasn’t hair-pop­ping sharp. A brief time on a di­a­mond stone cleaned that up quickly though, so it wasn’t a big deal.

The only other thing was the non-move­able pocket clip. I pre­fer tip down and like to have the op­tion of re­vers­ing the clip, but I’m pretty sure I’m in the mi­nor­ity there. Most folks I talk to pre­fer tip up so that likely won’t be an is­sue for most users.

Com­pet­i­tively Priced EDC

The Whisper is an in­ter­na­tional blade that has the strength de­sign char­ac­ter­is­tics to make it a good de­fense and backup blade, but it still has em­i­nent prac­ti­cal util­ity for com­mon ev­ery­day tasks that most of us per­form with

“THE WHISPER IS AN IN­TER­NA­TIONAL BLADE THAT HAS THE STRENGTH DE­SIGN CHAR­AC­TER­IS­TICS TO MAKE IT A GOOD DE­FENSE AND BACKUP BLADE...”

Top: The Whisper uses a 3.75-inch blade of D2 tool steel with a black ti­ta­nium coat­ing.

Bot­tom: The Whisper uses a deep carry pocket clip adorned with a Ja­panese mon, or fam­ily crest, at its end.

Bot­tom: The Whisper from Kizlyar and CAS Ibe­ria makes a great ev­ery­day carry piece.

Left: The Whisper's han­dle is milled from black and red G-10 in a di­a­mond pat­tern sim­i­lar to the han­dle wrap­ping used on tra­di­tional Ja­panese swords.

Top Left: The Whisper may han­dle mun­dane chores with ease, but it also makes for a fine, sturdy tac­ti­cal blade as well, and the au­thor car­ried it on duty as a backup blade. Bot­tom Right: The Whisper's clip is low profile and al­lows the knife to ride deeply and se­curely in the pocket.

Con­tact

Bot­tom: A dis­crete “Made in Rus­sia” stamp rests on the spine of the blade, proudly an­nounc­ing the Whisper's ori­gin. CAS Ibe­ria (800) 635-9366 www.ca­si­beria.com

Top Mid­dle: With a touch up on a di­a­mond stone, the Whisper was up to tough tasks like cut­ting through hemp rope. Top Right:the long han­dle of the Whisper makes it com­fort­able to hold in a va­ri­ety of grips.

Top Left: The D2 tool steel blade kept a good edge even af­ter ex­ten­sive test­ing on a va­ri­ety of ma­te­ri­als, like this hemp rope.

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