Fall in Love

This time of year may not be known for its flow­ers, but in the hands of Los An­ge­les florist Clover Chad­wick, the sea­son’s rich fo­liage, seed­pods, and sun­set-hued blooms truly come alive. Take some in­spi­ra­tion, as she does, from Mother Na­ture’s later work.

Martha Stewart Weddings - - IN THIS IS­SUE - TEXT BY CAR A SUL­LI­VAN PHO­TO­GRAPHS BY THAYER ALLYSON GO W DY

An L.A. florist cre­ates a ta­ble ar­range­ment and bram­bly bou­quet show­cas­ing au­tumn’s bounty.

AU­TUMN RIS­ING

The gar­den screen—an airy, elon­gated ar­range­ment that mim­ics the way plants grow in na­ture— is a sig­na­ture of Chad­wick’s busi­ness, Dan­de­lion Ranch. In this one, cat­tails, scabiosa, cro­cos­mia pods, red clover, and echi­nacea sway over a trove of pomegranates, white pumpkins, roses, lisianthus, and daisy mums. Gar­den screens can be any size and also “look great on walk­ways, buf­fets, and bars,” says Chad­wick.

Wild Thing

This bram­bly bou­quet cap­tures the essence of a sun-dap­pled fall meadow, thanks to its mix of warm col­ors and un­tamed, or­ganic shape. Imag­ined for an ad­ven­tur­ous, free-spir­ited bride, the ar­range­ment was built around a long swoop of bit­ter­sweet, which Chad­wick de­scribes as “a very spe­cial vine with a gor­geous cas­cade ef­fect.” Its yel­low flow­ers and or­ange berries are com­ple­mented by gar­den and spray roses, strawflow­ers, spi­der mums, red clover, and echi­nacea. Clus­ters of cro­cos­mia pods along with plumosa ferns, wheat, and yarrow add lay­ers of tex­ture, and it’s all bun­dled to­gether with a wide swath of silky rib­bon.

Gath­er­ing Place

This breath­tak­ing tan­gle of blos­soms and branches ap­pears to have been grow­ing here for years—and that’s ex­actly what Chad­wick in­tended. In plac­ing the rose hips, bit­ter­sweet, wax flow­ers, oak leaves, curly wil­low, chrysan­the­mums, nan­d­ina, and ivy, “we let the plants and flow­ers work their magic for us, tak­ing great care to em­u­late their nat­u­ral growth pat­terns,” she says. As for how to use a dis­play like this one, Chad­wick en­cour­ages cou­ples to think broadly. “It could be a cer­e­mony piece, a head-ta­ble back­drop, an es­cort-card dis­play—or you could even en­close a dance floor, so it feels like you’re danc­ing in a se­cret gar­den.”

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