MONOGRAMS

Ev­ery bride and groom want a wed­ding that feels uniquely their own. And what bet­ter way to achieve this than with monograms? You can use them to per­son­al­ize details of the day or as gifts for the bri­dal party. The de­sign you choose can re­flect your style,

Martha Stewart Weddings - - FROM DARCY - Darcy Miller Ed­i­tor at Large

Time it right. Monograms aren’t just for linens any­more. This is a big mo­ment of tran­si­tion for cou­ples, and you can high­light it in all sorts of fun ways—like hand­ing out temporary tat­toos with your ini­tials at a bri­dal shower! Just keep in mind: A “mar­ried” mono­gram should ap­pear postvows only. Your guests will en­joy see­ing the switch from prewed­ding ini­tials on the cer­e­mony pro­gram to the new­ly­wed ver­sion on the re­cep­tion menus. What’s in a name? Of course, many cou­ples go non­tra­di­tional. There are plenty of hy­phen­ated brides (and grooms), as well as cou­ples who keep their own names. Re­gard­less, the monograms of each half of the re­la­tion­ship can now be joined: You might pair your last ini­tials, or con­nect them with a line or plus sign. Or even do the same with just first ini­tials! Break with cus­tom. An even more cre­ative way to per­son­al­ize your wed­ding is to in­cor­po­rate a mo­tif that both of you find mean­ing­ful. Maybe there is a sym­bol that rep­re­sents an in­side joke or a shared hobby. You could use that em­blem to adorn ev­ery­thing from dé­cor to cake. De­sign your own. You don’t need to be a graphic artist: Many cal­lig­ra­phers and in­de­pen­dent de­sign­ers, for a rea­son­able fee, will cre­ate a mono­gram that suits who you are as a cou­ple; just do a quick on­line search. Or, if you’re buy­ing gifts or reg­is­ter­ing for house­wares, some re­tail­ers, such as Mark and Gra­ham, have cus­tom­mono­gram gen­er­a­tors on their web­sites for per­son­al­iz­ing a range of prod­ucts. Monograms ev­ery­where. Fi­nally, em­brace ini­tials! Have your bou­quet rib­bon or nap­kins em­broi­dered. Give brides­maids their own ini­tials on neck­laces or busi­ness-card hold­ers. Or­der a stamp and use it on your menus, place cards—the works. (Etsy is a good re­source for cus­tom-stamp mak­ers; many will let you up­load your own art­work.) Or reg­is­ter for mono­grammed items like china, then cel­e­brate the sym­bol of your union for years to come.

THE DETAI LS: 1. Gold and sil­ver ini­tial tat­toos, $1 for 3 let­ters, fash­ion­tats.com. 2. Maya Bren­ner asym­met­ri­cal ini­tial neck­laces, 14k gold, $240 each, markand­gra­ham.com. 3. Ini­tial busi­ness­card holder, $30, kates­pade.com. 4. Sig­na­ture Mono­grammed China Col­lec­tion din­ner plate, $335 for a 5-piece place set­ting, pickard­china.com. 5. Cus­tom mono­gram (for wed­ding suite), price upon re­quest, stephaniefish­wick.com.

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