King Solomon Knew Enough To Rely On Di­vine Wis­dom

McDonald County Press - - CHURCH - By Dr. Don Kuehle DON KUEHLE IS A RE­TIRED UNITED METHODIST MIN­IS­TER WHO LIVES IN JACK­SON. OPIN­IONS EX­PRESSED ARE THOSE OF THE AU­THOR.

King David was dy­ing. Un­known to him, his son, Adoni­jah, had de­clared him­self to be the next king of Is­rael. Adoni­jah had the sup­port of Joab (com­man­der of the army) and of Abiathar (the pri­est). David dis­cov­ered this plot and im­me­di­ately de­clared Solomon as the next king over Is­rael. Solomon was duly anointed and known for his wis­dom. That is how he be­came the new king of Is­rael.

Solomon re­mem­bered the fi­nal words of his fa­ther, David, “Be strong. Walk in God’s ways. Keep God’s laws and com­mand­ments. Re­main faith­ful to God. Trust God’s guid­ance in all things.” Good ad­vice for Solomon. Good ad­vice for us to­day.

One Wish — As Solomon be­gan his reign as king, God granted him one wish. Solomon re­sponded, “I wish for Your di­vine wis­dom.” God granted Solomon his wish. If God granted us one wish, what would we wish for?

Wis­dom — is the abil­ity to dis­tin­guish be­tween right and wrong, be­tween good and evil. Wis­dom orig­i­nates with the God who is all-wise. Di­vine wis­dom orig­i­nates with the God who fully knows all things, and who fully un­der­stands the dif­fer­ence be­tween right and wrong, good and evil, what is best and what is not. God’s wis­dom is not limited by time or space. God’s wis­dom is al­ways ac­cu­rate and cor­rect. Hu­man “wis­dom” is al­ways limited, al­ways slanted and bi­ased, al­ways tends to lead us away from God.

Solomon was soon put to the test. Two women claimed the same baby — whose was it? Solomon placed the baby on a ta­ble and took out his sword, “I have a sim­ple so­lu­tion. I’ll cut the baby in two and give each of you half. No! Don’t harm the baby; give him to the other woman,” cried one of the women. Solomon knew then who the real mother was. The story spread like wild­fire through­out the king­dom, and to sur­round­ing coun­tries.

Solomon was hum­ble enough to rec­og­nize his sin­ful na­ture, his hu­man lim­i­ta­tions and his need for God’s guid­ance. The same should be true for us to­day!

Solomon’s “wis­dom” is avail­able to us in the Book of Proverbs, a col­lec­tion of wise say­ings deal­ing with all as­pects of life. “Rev­er­ence for God is where wis­dom orig­i­nates.” “Only a fool would re­ject di­vine wis­dom, and rely only on their hu­man wis­dom.” “A soft an­swer turns aside wrath.” “Wine and strong drink will lead a per­son away from God.” “Train a child in the ways of God, and when they are older they will re­mem­ber their teach­ings.”

Re­ly­ing on di­vine wis­dom, King Solomon ful­filled his fa­ther’s dream of build­ing a tem­ple to honor God. He ruled fairly, hon­estly and wisely for many years, and God blessed his reign.

Re­ly­ing on God’s wis­dom is the only way to live. Let’s be hum­ble enough to rely on God.

Wis­dom is the abil­ity to dis­tin­guish be­tween right and wrong, be­tween good and evil. Wis­dom orig­i­nates with the God who is all-wise. Di­vine

wis­dom orig­i­nates with the God who fully knows all things, and who fully un­der­stands the dif­fer­ence be­tween right and wrong, good and evil, what is best and what is not. God’s wis­dom is not limited by time or space. God’s wis­dom is al­ways ac­cu­rate and cor­rect. Hu­man ‘wis­dom’ is al­ways limited, al­ways slanted and bi­ased, al­ways

tends to lead us away from God.

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