Al­most ‘Magic’

MAKE HEALTHY YOUR NEW HAPPY We find out just what it takes to get ripped like the men of “Magic Mike XXL.”

Metro USA (Boston) - - WELLBEING - ELODIE NOEL, MWN @MetroBOS letters@metro.us

Celebrity trainer Ron Mathews first started work­ing with Joe Man­ganiello six years ago, when the ac­tor was cast in HBO’s “True Blood.”

Back then, Man­ganiello was 6'5” and weighed 240 pounds, and Mathews re­mem­bers him say­ing, “‘I want to get big­ger; I want to be mus­cu­lar.’ And I told him, ‘Ac­tu­ally, you need to get smaller.’”

It’s re­lated to the cam­era adding 10 pounds: “When you do a slow work­out, you tend to look big in per­son, but you look a bit floppy on­screen,” he ex­plains. “Tak­ing his body fat down makes mus­cles pop on­screen.”

What it takes to take it off

But Man­ganiello had to push his reg­i­men (de­tailed in the book he and Mathews worked on to­gether, “Evo­lu­tion”) even fur­ther for the male strip­per se­quel “Magic Mike XXL.”

“For ‘Magic Mike,’ he wanted to look re­ally big and cut,” Mathews says. “It’s a very phys­i­cal role with the danc­ing; it was about look­ing good but also mov­ing well with co­or­di­na­tion like an ath­lete. It was about train­ing to be able to per­form, as op­posed to just stand­ing there in front of the cam­era and look­ing good.”

Train­ing meant work­ing out six days a week — twice a day. Morn­ings were car­dio (on an empty stom­ach) then in the af­ter­noon or evening, Man­ganiello did weight train­ing. The work­out takes about an hour, in­clud­ing a warm-up and a cooldown, and it is very fast, with few breaks. “The idea is to keep his heart rate very high,” says Mathews.

The role of food

The right diet is a huge part of the reg­i­men, and Man­ganiello was a dream client. “He is in­cred­i­bly dis­ci­plined,” says Mathews. “The good thing about him is that he doesn’t need a lot of va­ri­ety, so if you tell him that’s what you need to eat, he will do it over and over again.”

When you’re work­ing to­ward a fit­ness goal, Mathews says, food is not for plea­sure; it is just another tool. Man­ganiello ate six meals a day, roughly 500 to 600 calo­ries each with 30 per­cent pro­tein, 30 per­cent fat and 40 per­cent carbs. Each meal was pretty sim­i­lar and con­sisted of eggs, chicken, veg­eta­bles and rice or pota­toes. The calo­ries could also come from a big salad or sushi, as long as you go easy on the rice.

“When try­ing to lose fat while keep­ing your mus­cle, you need to make sure you get enough calo­ries, be­cause if you don’t, you will lose mus­cle,” ex­plains Mathews. “You need to be able to main­tain your frame and have enough energy to pur­sue your work­out.”

Morn­ing:

Af­ter­noon:

Ex­am­ple se­quence: Fol­lowed by some func­tional ex­er­cises:

CLAUDETTE BARIUS, WARNER BROS.

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