clas­sic hol­i­day fla­vors, reimag­ined

Midwest Living - - Best Chalet'ed Plans -

cran­berry crum­ble pie

Lisa leaves a peek­a­boo hole in the brown sug­arand-oat streusel to glimpse the ruby fill­ing in­side. (She con­fesses this pie, topped with vanilla ice cream, might be her all-time Sis­ter Pie fa­vorite.)

bit­ter­sweet choco­late and pear pie

A hand­ful of chopped choco­late sprin­kled over the bot­tom crust melts and min­gles with the pear juices while bak­ing, cre­at­ing a sin­fully rich fill­ing.

toasted marsh­mal­low sweet potato pie

A Thanks­giv­ing clas­sic, in pie form. For beau­ti­ful bronz­ing, in­dulge your in­ner pyro: Buy an in­ex­pen­sive culi­nary blow­torch and toast the meringue un­til it smells like a camp­fire s’more.

ap­ple sage gouda pie

In­spired by the tra­di­tional combo of ap­ple pie and a wedge of cheese, Lisa adds grated Gouda to her crust and fresh sage to the fruit, cre­at­ing a sweet pie with sa­vory at­ti­tude.

piecrust crack­ers

At Sis­ter Pie, the daily soup al­ways comes with a few of these but­tery crack­ers, flecked with seeds, cheese or pa­prika. You could also serve them with drinks at the hol­i­days.

BE­GIN­NER-FRIENDLY PLAN TO USE YOUR FIRST PRAC­TICE BATCH OF PAS­TRY TO MAKE THESE AD­DIC­TIVE (AND FOR­GIV­ING) CRACK­ERS. YOU WON’T HAVE TO ROLL A PER­FECT CIR­CLE OR CRIMP A PIE’S EDGE.

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