Tower Hob­bies Up­roar V2 .46/EP ARF

An up­dated ver­sion of a sport fa­vorite

Model Airplane News - - CONTENTS - By Michael York

An up­dated ver­sion of a sport fa­vorite

Those of us who have been in this hobby for a while can cer­tainly re­mem­ber the orig­i­nal Up­roar 40 kit. It was easy to build, and its all-around flight ca­pa­bil­i­ties made it an in­stant fa­vorite. It took a while, but ver­sion 2 is fi­nally here. Gary Wright’s orig­i­nal de­sign has been up­dated for even bet­ter per­for­mance, and timechal­lenged pi­lots will ap­pre­ci­ate that it’s now an al­most-ready-to-fly (ARF) model.

The model comes fully cov­ered, and just like the orig­i­nal, it is built with an open balsa/light-ply struc­ture. It’s de­signed for ei­ther a .46-size glow en­gine or equiv­a­lent elec­tric power such as a Rim­Fire .32, and it has hard­ware for both, in­clud­ing en­gine mounts and fuel tank. Speak­ing of hard­ware, the plane comes com­plete with ev­ery­thing you need be­sides radio gear and the pow­er­plant. All items are neatly pack­aged in bag­gies and grouped to­gether as needed for the assem­bly, which re­ally helps keep bolts and screws from get­ting lost or mixed up. An ex­cel­lent man­ual guides you through the assem­bly and of­fers a lot of con­struc­tion tips and hints.

The Up­roar V2 is an ex­cel­lent choice for in­ter­me­di­ate pi­lots or ad­vanced begin­ners as well as ex­pert pi­lots who want a go-to plane that can do ev­ery­thing their hearts’ de­sire.

THIS PLANE CAN COVER A WIDE GAMUT OF FLY­ING AND WILL BE THE ONE YOU GRAB WHEN YOU CAN TAKE ONLY ONE BIRD TO THE FIELD. JUST LIKE THE ORIG­I­NAL, THE TOWER HOB­BIES UP­ROAR V2 CAN BE BUILT AND FLOWN BY NEARLY ANY­ONE AND WILL CER­TAINLY BE­COME A CLAS­SIC IN ITS OWN RIGHT.

UNIQUE FEA­TURES

When I first picked up the box, I was won­der­ing if Tower Hob­bies ac­ci­den­tally sent me an empty car­ton. This thing is light! It’s ba­si­cally a high-lift wing with a min­i­mal­is­tic fuse­lage and tail. I knew it was go­ing to be a fun plane to fly.

Assem­bly is typ­i­cal for a wooden ARF. There is just enough work to be done to make you feel like you’ve ac­com­plished some­thing. There is min­i­mal prep of the cov­er­ing ma­te­rial prior to the assem­bly, and a quick once-over with a cov­er­ing iron or heat gun will en­sure ev­ery­thing is taut. A few spots of the cov­er­ing need to be re­moved, like servo open­ings and wing-joint ar­eas, and it’s a good idea to save the re­moved cov­er­ing pieces for spot re­pairs in the fu­ture. Hinges for all the con­trol sur­faces need to be glued in place, but they come pres­lot­ted. The tail feath­ers fea­ture tongue-and-slot align­ment, which makes it easy to en­sure that the assem­bly is true. Don’t go crazy with the epoxy, as any ex­tra un­nec­es­sary weight will need to be com­pen­sated for at the front end to achieve bal­ance.

The two-piece wing (an up­date from the orig­i­nal one-piece wing) plugs onto a 3/4-inch alu­minum tube and is held in place with a sim­ple tab/bolt setup, mak­ing trans­port and stor­age a breeze (although with a 47-inch wing­span, the Up­roar is easy to trans­port fully as­sem­bled). One of the dif­fer­ences from the orig­i­nal de­sign is the re­mov­able side-force gen­er­a­tors. Since the fuse­lage has a very low pro­file, the side­force gen­er­a­tors al­low the Up­roar V2 to eas­ily per­form knife-edge flight as well as pro­vide ad­di­tional di­rec­tional sta­bil­ity.

IN THE AIR

With the rec­om­mended mo­tor and bat­tery, the Up­roar V2 bal­anced just a tad tail­heavy from the mid­point, which the man­ual rec­om­mended. The Up­roar does have a wide cen­ter-of-grav­ity range, but I al­ways like to test-fly at the sug­gested point. De­spite adding just a bit of lead, the model came in right at the man­u­fac­turer’s rec­om­mended weight.

With all that wing and plenty of power, the model was air­borne in just a few feet. Con­trol throws on low rates were very re­lax­ing, and once I got a feel of the han­dling, I switched to mid- and 3D modes. As you can imag­ine, with those large sur­faces, the Up­roar’s char­ac­ter­is­tics go from mild to wild.

Land­ings are a plea­sure, and a bit of power al­lows a nice pitch-up at­ti­tude for a slow three-point touch­down. The long gear works great both on pave­ment and in less-thanfreshly-mowed grass.

GEN­ERAL FLIGHT PER­FOR­MANCE

Sta­bil­ity: At the rec­om­mended cen­ter of grav­ity and low throws, the Up­roar V2 can be a docile plane. It isn’t quite a trainer, but it is very pre­dictable.

Track­ing: With its flat wing, the Up­roar V2 is a point-and-go type of plane. The side-force gen­er­a­tors do keep things pointed in the right di­rec­tion, es­pe­cially when the cen­ter of grav­ity is in the for­ward range.

Aer­o­bat­ics: Move the cen­ter of grav­ity rear­ward and go to high-throw set­tings to un­leash an aer­o­batic ma­chine. Though not quite a full-blown 3D plane, it will do pretty much any­thing you can think of.

Glide and stall per­for­mance: This is a clean air­frame, and it has a sur­pris­ing amount of glide when kept flat. Point the nose up with­out power and the light air­frame quickly runs out of mo­men­tum. When it does stall, it’s straight­for­ward and quick.

PILOT DEBRIEFING

This is a true all-in-one plane. Whether it’s slow fly­ing around the pat­tern or per­form­ing physics-de­fy­ing ma­neu­vers, the Up­roar V2 is ea­ger and willing. The ad­di­tion of side-force gen­er­a­tors in­creases its knife-edge ca­pa­bil­i­ties as well as its re­cov­ery from ex­treme un­usual at­ti­tudes. The Up­roar V2 is a con­fi­den­cein­spir­ing plane that begs you to try out new ma­neu­vers be­cause it is so pre­dictable in its re­cov­ery.

Above: With the un­der­side hatch re­moved, you can see the sim­ple radio in­stal­la­tion as well as the in­ge­nious wing re­ten­tion sys­tem. The fiber­glass wash­ers en­sure that the wings stay put with­out mar­ring the al­loy tangs. Below: The Up­roar V2 flies just as well in­verted as it does right side up. De­spite be­ing a sim­ple liv­ery, it was easy for me to dif­fer­en­ti­ate be­tween top and bot­tom.

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