On con­sumerism

Modern Healthcare - - NEWS -

MH: The IT space is ripe for be­ing used to in­ter­act with the con­sumer. There’s a lot more than the por­tal go­ing on. Are your pa­tients or prospec­tive pa­tients us­ing IT to help them have health­ier lives or in­ter­face with the sys­tem?

Halamka:

For us it’s been a 20-year jour­ney. In 1999, we first made avail­able the en­tire elec­tronic health record, labs and meds, and prob­lems, to every pa­tient via a web browser. Then, about five or six years ago, we added every note writ­ten about you by every per­son so that truly noth­ing would be done with­out your in­volve­ment as a shared team mem­ber.

That was ac­tu­ally kind of tricky. This ac­tu­ally hap­pened. I wrote the fol­low­ing note: “The asthma pa­tient came to the emer­gency depart­ment with SOB.” That means short­ness of breath. The pa­tient thought I was re­fer­ring to her hus­band. So it’s a jour­ney, right?

Then we’ve moved from web to mo­bile, and 80% of the ac­cesses of Beth Is­rael Dea­coness data by con­sumers to­day are done through mo­bile ap­pli­ca­tions. The web is dy­ing and maybe even mo­bile will die in a cou­ple of years and be re­placed by Alexa and am­bi­ent lis­ten­ing in the home. The apps we’ve launched are such things as BIDMC@Home, and the in­ter­net of things, where a de­vice in your home re­ports its data to us, subjective and ob­jec­tive data, sur­veys, how you do­ing, what’s your mood.

What a por­tal does is not ac­tion­able. You resched­ule ap­point­ments, you get re­fer­rals, and you en­gage in al­most so­cial me­dia-like in­ter­ac­tions with your care team us­ing mo­bile ap­pli­ca­tions. That’s the next cou­ple of years for us. But we are do­ing the Alexa ex­per­i­ment as fol­lows: If an am­bi­ent lis­ten­ing de­vice in your home, with your con­sent, hears some­thing like, “I need to see my doc­tor,” it then re­sponds, us­ing the Ama­zon Alexa API, “Next Tues­day at 3 there’s an avail­able ap­point­ment. Is that OK?” Booked! That’s the kind of tra­jec­tory we’re on.

The web is dy­ing and maybe even mo­bile will die in a cou­ple of years and be re­placed by Alexa and am­bi­ent lis­ten­ing in the home.

Dr. John Halamka

Probst: We’re just tool­ing right now for con­sumerism. We’ve done ev­ery­thing from por­tals to mo­bile, and we’re play­ing with Alexa and look­ing at spe­cific apps and pi­lot­ing a lot of things. There are so many lev­els you have to work at.

There’s the tech­ni­cal level where we’ve got to fig­ure out how they can in­ter­act with our legacy prod­ucts be­cause pa­tients want to know about their med­i­cal records. They want to be able to or­der pre­scrip­tions. They want to be able to sched­ule things and a lot of that ends up land­ing in­side of our legacy ap­pli­ca­tions.

We’re work­ing hard on a mid­dle layer that’s go­ing to al­low us to sur­face data in th­ese more con­sumer-based ap­pli­ca­tions. But ap­ply­ing tech­nol­ogy to our cur­rent op­er­a­tional struc­ture, even the way our build­ings are built, is au­tomat­ing chaos. So you’ve got to have this very process-based, op­er­a­tions-based change.

And then what’s kind of unique is a men­tal­ity of mar­ket­ing. How do we ap­ply so­cial me­dia? How do we use th­ese dif­fer­ent pieces of tech­nol­ogy and in­for­ma­tion to en­gage our pa­tients bet­ter? It doesn’t have to be through an app. It could be through a phone call. It could be through ad­ver­tis­ing that’s ap­pro­pri­ate. We’re just in the tool­ing stage. We’re build­ing the jour­neys— that’s the ter­mi­nol­ogy to­day, pa­tient jour­neys. We’re look­ing at build­ing those jour­neys and ap­ply­ing the tech­nol­ogy to sup­port them.

Cham­bers: We are so far be­hind every other in­dus­try that we can steal un­abashedly. We’re just now start­ing to un­der­stand that we need to in­ter­face with the pa­tients the way they want to be in­ter­faced with, as op­posed to what we’ve tra­di­tion­ally done for the past hun­dred years, which is, “You will be here at this time and if you’re late you don’t get in and, oh, by the way, the doc­tor is al­ready 30 min­utes late.”

We’ve all got a lot we can do to im­prove. Treat pa­tients as if they have a choice, be­cause they do. For a long, long, long time, we haven’t treated them that way.

Treat pa­tients as if they have a choice, be­cause they do. For a long, long, long time, we haven’t treated them that way.

Matthew Cham­bers

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.