NWA LET­TERS

Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette - - EDITORIAL PAGE - let­ters@nwadg.com

Leg­is­la­tors ‘turn noses up’ on Supreme Court

The old say­ing goes, never dis­cuss pol­i­tics or re­li­gion. But I’m so up­set I could spit and leave the state of Arkansas.

Our “dis­tin­guished” law­mak­ers have come up with this list of amend­ments to the Arkansas Con­sti­tu­tion. Of course, we, the vot­ers de­cide if they be­come part of the Con­sti­tu­tion, but af­ter read­ing this list, I have to won­der what is wrong with some of th­ese elected se­na­tors and rep­re­sen­ta­tives.

Just one ex­am­ple: A few years ago, the state Leg­is­la­ture voted in fa­vor of voter ID. The gov­er­nor ve­toed it and it then went to the Arkansas Supreme Court, which over­turned it. We haven’t had to show an ID to vote since. The Arkansas Supreme Court ruled it was un­con­sti­tu­tional to re­quire any­one to show an ID to vote. Now, now we have both a state sen­a­tor and a state rep­re­sen­ta­tive spon­sor­ing amend­ments es­sen­tially thumb­ing their noses at the Arkansas Supreme Court.

Where do they get off? We have checks and bal­ances for a rea­son. And a Con­sti­tu­tion. But th­ese peo­ple ap­par­ently couldn’t care less about such an es­teemed part of our po­lit­i­cal sys­tem, the ju­di­cial branch.

Where is that spit­toon? ROGER WALKER Eureka Springs

Pres­i­dent leads in U.S. ‘fak­ing it’ epi­demic

Re­cently I watched a pro­gram on CBS Sun­day Morn­ing con­cern­ing lip sync­ing by vo­cal­ists when per­form­ing live. In other words, pre­tend­ing to sing a song when they are only mov­ing their lips with the mu­sic pre­re­corded. The gist of the pro­gram was that this was not a new phe­nom­e­non, that it took a lot of tal­ent to fool the au­di­ence, and the nar­ra­tor and guests seemed to ap­prove of the de­cep­tion. In ear­lier days, the pub­lic was highly crit­i­cal of a vo­cal­ist fak­ing it.

The epi­demic of lip-synch­ing, which I will re­fer to as fake singing, is just an­other ex­am­ple of fak­ing some­thing to ob­tain a ben­e­fit, such as rest­ing their voice and sav­ing money by us­ing a pre­re­corded ac­com­pa­ni­ment. Here are some other ex­am­ples of this tac­tic, which is sim­i­lar to fraud.

1. Fake grades in school, in which a per­son grad­u­ates with a B av­er­age but is func­tion­ally il­lit­er­ate due to read­ing and writ­ing de­fi­cien­cies, the prod­uct of easy cour­ses, easy tests and easy grad­ing. This is a prod­uct of the cur­rent trend in ed­u­ca­tion where ob­tain­ing a de­gree has a pri­or­ity over the qual­ity of the ed­u­ca­tion.

2. Fake hand­bags (knock-offs) that are sold in most cities, fake jew­elry, fake paint­ings and cloth­ing rep­re­sented as name brand when it wasn’t.

3. Fake re­sumes to help a per­son find a job he isn’t qual­i­fied for, or used for po­lit­i­cal pur­poses, where the per­son al­leges fight­ing on ac­tive duty in Iraq, which was un­true.

4. Fake med­i­cal records to en­able some­one to ob­tain Medi­care ben­e­fits they were not en­ti­tled to, fake IDs and fake de­grees.

5. Also, where the au­thor of a book, school pa­per or speech rep­re­sents that the prod­uct is his own when he has used some­one else’s work, which is the def­i­ni­tion of pla­gia­rism.

What is most dis­turb­ing is that Pres­i­dent Trump’s use of fake news give a le­git­i­macy to oth­ers do­ing the same, and you be­gin to ques­tion ev­ery­thing. This re­minds me of the ques­tion raised about some­one who is noted for telling lies: “How do you know when he is ly­ing,” with the an­swer “when­ever he is mov­ing his lips.” If you can’t trust your pres­i­dent, who can you trust?

In most cases there is a win­ner and a loser when it comes to fak­ing it. One way of look­ing at it is that you aren’t get­ting what you paid for. You might even say you elected a fake pres­i­dent in that you didn’t get what you ex­pected when re­mem­ber­ing his cam­paign prom­ises. I ad­mit that all politi­cians bend the truth to at­tract vot­ers, but our new pres­i­dent is set­ting a new record of fak­ing it.

What makes mat­ters worse is when the of­fender says it is just good busi­ness to fake a lit­tle here and there, and why not join in since ev­ery­one is do­ing it. BASS TRUMBO Fayet­teville

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