THE STYLE

Old House Journal - - Design -

ITAL­IANATE?

The word refers to the more free­wheel­ing Amer­i­can ex­pres­sions in a se­ries of Re­nais­sance-in­spired styles ca. 1845 to 1900. As­so­ci­ated with 19th-cen­tury farm­houses, it be­came the most pop­u­lar build­ing style for decades, through­out the coun­try.

TUSCAN VILLA

This purist type has a foursquare foot­print and cu­bic mass­ing. Its hipped roof is topped with a square cupola called a belvedere.

ITAL­IAN VILLA

Unend­ingly pic­turesque, this no­ble vari­ant is asym­met­ri­cally (usu­ally) an­chored by a square tower called a cam­panile. Note quoins at the cor­ners.

SIM­PLE ITAL­IANATE

The word “Ital­ianate” refers to a com­bi­na­tion of Ital­ian Re­nais­sance shapes and de­tails ren­dered in sim­pli­fied, or oc­ca­sion­ally ex­ag­ger­ated, fash­ion.

ROW HOUSES

The re­lated ur­ban high style was Re­nais­sance Re­vival, but row houses were of­ten built in the ver­nac­u­lar: brown­stone in Man­hat­tan, wood in San Fran­cisco.

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