PE­RIOD EL­E­VA­TORS

Old House Journal - - They Still MAke... -

When it comes to new home el­e­va­tors, cus­tomiza­tion is as­sumed! Trimmed to match the house, the ac­cess door blends right in; open it to find the car wain­scoted or pan­eled in hard­wood. Op­tions ex­tend to panel styles, stain­less steel and glass, and a va­ri­ety of doors and gates. You may even sup­ply your own light fix­ture. Adding a res­i­den­tial el­e­va­tor starts with your ar­chi­tect, who uses the man­u­fac­turer’s de­sign guides in plan­ning. The lo­cal dis­trib­u­tor then cre­ates spe­cific, ac­cu­rate plans and the el­e­va­tor is built. In­stal­la­tion is by the dis­trib­u­tor.

A wind­ing drum el­e­va­tor is sim­i­lar to early ver­sions, us­ing air­craft ca­bles at­tached to a ro­tat­ing drum and vari­able-speed mo­tor. Hy­draulic drives are pop­u­lar for their quiet ride. An in­line gear drive el­e­va­tor, coun­ter­weighted for en­ergy ef­fi­ciency, doesn’t re­quire a ma­chine room. Shown: a LU/LA (limited use/ap­pli­ca­tion) el­e­va­tor with cus­tom car and hoist­way styling, de­signed for a mu­seum. Sym­me­try El­e­va­tors, (877) 568-5804,

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