RAPID RE­COV­ERY

HUNTERS HAVE BEEN TAUGHT TO WAIT BE­FORE AP­PROACH­ING A WOUNDED ANIMAL. THAT’S NOT AL­WAYS THE SMART PLAY

Outdoor Life - - HUNTING - BY NATALIE KREBS

Con­ven­tional wis­dom di­rects that biggame hunters should wait a min­i­mum of a half hour to pur­sue their quarry af­ter any shot that re­quires trail­ing. The idea is that an animal doesn’t al­ways die right away, and by giving it time and space to ex­pire, you’re not spik­ing its sys­tem with adren­a­line that might cause it to run far­ther. Wait­ing lets an animal bed down and bleed out, aid­ing your even­tual re­cov­ery.

But on a re­cent sa­fari for Namib­ian plains game, my pro­fes­sional hunter didn’t wait even 30 se­conds af­ter my shot. He would chase game that fled af­ter a hit, leav­ing me to scramble for my safety and run af­ter them both. I was in­trigued by this rule of the bush—un­less

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