TOMA­TOES

Palm Beach Daily News - - TODAY -

“Can­ning toma­toes must have an in­tense tomato aroma and deep red color,” Anita Lorello said. “The pro­cess­ing be­gins by re­mov­ing the stem and core, cut­ting them in half and plac­ing the toma­toes in a large pot. They are sim­mered for about 40 min­utes and drained for 10.”

“The cooked toma­toes are run through a spremipo­modoro elet­trico ,oran elec­tric tomato squeezer, we bought years ago in New York’s Lit­tle Italy.

The ma­chine re­moves skin, seeds and purees the toma­toes.”

The thick pas­sata ,or puree, is packed into onequart jars, capped and placed in a large ket­tle filled with wa­ter and left to cook at a medium boil for 45 min­utes. Once cooled, the caps are tight­ened and placed in the pantry.

Fifty pounds of toma­toes yields 14 quarts of pas­sata, and eight quarts of rich juice that may be used for stocks.

Can­ning is the trendy dar­ling of home cooks to­day. They know ex­actly what in­gre­di­ents are in the jars.

Farm-fresh Roma plum toma­toes from the mid-At­lantic and North­east may be found at green­gro­cers through­out our area. Lo­cally grown toma­toes will be­gin com­ing on the mar­ket in October and Novem­ber.

Cooked toma­toes may also be pureed man­u­ally through a food mill to re­move the skin and seeds.

Home-can­ning toma­toes — or other fruits and veg­eta­bles — is a fun pro­ject and the re­sults yield de­li­cious, healthy hol­i­day gifts for friends and fam­ily.

Lo­cally grown toma­toes will be­gin com­ing on the mar­ket in October and

Novem­ber.

Home-can­ning toma­toes is a fun pro­ject and yields de­li­cious, healthy hol­i­day gifts for friends and fam­ily.

Anita Lorello keeps her stash of freshly canned tomato puree in­side a closet of her North End home.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.