BLASFEMEA Galaxia Trop­i­calia (La Lis­bon­era)

Pasatiempo - - Pasa Tempos -

Orig­i­nally re­leased out­side the U.S. in the fall of 2009 but now avail­able here (and as a down­load), Galaxia

Trop­i­calia as­sem­bles a quar­tet of young, hand­some, and tal­ented Por­tu­gal-based mu­si­cians for their de­but full-length CD — a psy­che­delic jour­ney through orig­i­nal (mostly) ’80s-styled in­die-elec­tropop and angsty throw­back Brit rock. If Por­tu­gal ever wanted a “fab four” of its own, Blasfemea is it. In­flu­enced as much by The Cure as by Oa­sis, New Or­der, and the guitarra por­tuguesa and fado of its home­land, Blasfemea doesn’t hes­i­tate to cut right to the in­spi­ra­tion and pur­pose for its mu­sic: girls. Blasfemea’s songs have al­ways been named af­ter mem­bers of the op­po­site sex (“Maria,” “Kaede,” etc). Ibe­rian dance rock mak­ing a big splash on Amer­i­can shores might seem like a stretch, but these boys are mighty flex­i­ble — both vo­cally and in­stru­men­tally. Tracks like “Eva” and “Vic­to­ria” are night­club an­thems just wait­ing to be un­leashed in state­side Latin-mash-up dance mixes, and singers Ti­ago Amaro and Fabio Jeve­lim do their best Liam Gal­lagher im­pres­sions through­out, mak­ing the al­bum ac­ces­si­ble to fans of sneer­ing Manch­ester pop rock and clas­sic house mu­sic alike. “Ida,” fea­tur­ing Bri­tish new wave/punk re­vival­ists Dead Kids, is the al­bum’s golden moment. Michael Jack­son’s die-hard dis­ci­ples should steer clear of the Blasfemea cover of the King of Pop’s “Dirty Diana.” While it’s not aw­ful, to some, it could be con­sid­ered pre­ma­ture — if not a bit blas­phe­mous. — Rob DeWalt

Blasfemea doesn’t hes­i­tate

to cut right to the in­spi­ra­tion and

pur­pose for its mu­sic: girls.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.