open­ing this week

Pasatiempo - - Moving Images -

DUE DATE For this 2010 update of the Planes, Trains, and Au­to­mo­biles for­mula, two of the hottest names in Hollywood — Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Gal­i­fi­anakis — play two un­likely travel com­pan­ions who at­tempt to get to a cer­tain place by a cer­tain time (the birth of a child). Per­haps you can guess who is the up­tight pro­tag­o­nist and who is his comic foil. Di­rected by Todd Phillips ( The Han­gover). Rated R. 100 min­utes. Re­gal Sta­dium 14, Santa Fe; Dream­Catcher, Es­pañola; Reel Deal, Los Alamos; Sto­ry­teller, Taos. (Not re­viewed) FAIR GAME Di­rec­tor Doug Li­man’s fea­ture about the lives of Joe Wil­son and Va­lerie Plame Wil­son (por­trayed by Sean Penn and Naomi Watts) gets an ad­vance screen­ing in Santa Fe, with the Wil­sons in at­ten­dance for a post-screen­ing Q&A ses­sion. 7 p.m. Fri­day, Nov. 5, only. Rated PG-13. 108 min­utes. Len­sic Per­form­ing Arts Cen­ter, Santa Fe. (Not re­viewed)

See story, Page 44. FOR COL­ORED GIRLS Based on the 1975 Obie Award-win­ning play by Ntozake Shange, Tyler Perry’s film has an en­sem­ble cast that in­cludes Janet Jack­son, Thandie Newton, Kerry Washington, Phyli­cia Rashad, and Whoopi Gold­berg). From the trailer, it looks more art­ful than the di­rec­tor’s usual of­fer­ings. Rated R. 120 min­utes. Re­gal Sta­dium 14, Santa Fe;

Dream­Catcher, Es­pañola. (Not re­viewed)

HENRI-GE­ORGES CLOUzOT’S IN­FERNO

In 1964, famed French film di­rec­tor Henri-Ge­orges Clouzot as­sem­bled an ex­cel­lent cast and crew to make a film about how jeal­ousy could “de­form the uni­verse.” But the project, In­ferno, burned out Clouzot and most par­tic­i­pants in months. The movie was never com­pleted. The 13 hours of sur­viv­ing footage is the main fo­cus of this doc­u­men­tary by film his­to­ri­ans Serge Bromberg and Ruxan­dra Me­drea. The orig­i­nal un­com­pleted film is still fas­ci­nat­ing and ex­per­i­men­tal and filled with scenes of se­duc­tion — hot stuff, as any in­ferno should be. 95 min­utes. Not rated.

CCA Cine­math­eque, Santa Fe. (Robert Nott)

See re­view, Page 54.

LAST TRAIN HOME

This doc­u­men­tary fol­lows par­ents Zhang Changhua and Chen Suqin as they join 130 mil­lion other Chi­nese mi­grant fac­tory work­ers in a mass hol­i­day ex­o­dus to see their fam­i­lies. The di­rec­tor, Chi­ne­se­born Cana­dian cit­i­zen Lixin Fan, fol­lowed Zhang and Chen for three years as they strug­gled to hold to­gether their fam­ily while work­ing 14-hour shifts in a fac­tory a thou­sand miles away from their fam­ily. As the movie re­veals, the new in­dus­trial China prom­ises fam­i­lies the op­por­tu­nity for ad­vance­ment while de­priv­ing chil­dren of the only thing that ac­tu­ally holds the fam­ily to­gether — their par­ents. Not rated. 87 min­utes. In Man­darin and Sichuan di­alect with sub­ti­tles. The Screen, Santa Fe. (Casey Sanchez) See re­view, Page 54.

MEGAMIND

Not six months af­ter De­spi­ca­ble Me, here comes an­other an­i­mated ac­tion/com­edy about an evil ge­nius who is forced to try his hand at be­com­ing a hero and sav­ing the day. But Megamind is to­tally dif­fer­ent — Will Fer­rell sup­plies the voice of the lead char­ac­ter, not Steve Carell, and it’s about su­per­heroes, not spies. Rated PG. 96 min­utes. Screens in 3-D and 2-D at Re­gal Sta­dium 14, Santa Fe; Dream­Catcher, Es­pañola; Sto­ry­teller, Taos. Screens in 3-D only at Reel Deal, Los Alamos. (Not re­viewed)

MORN­ING GLORY

In a work­place com­edy writ­ten by The Devil Wears Prada scribe Aline Brosh McKenna, Rachel McA­dams plays an up­start pro­ducer who brings in a griz­zled vet­eran an­chor­man (Har­ri­son Ford) to help save her morn­ing show. Diane Keaton and Jeff Gold­bum co-star, which can only mean good things. Opens Wed­nes­day, Nov. 10. Rated PG-13. 95 min­utes. Re­gal Sta­dium 14, Santa Fe;

Dream­Catcher, Es­pañola. (Not re­viewed)

NOWHERE BOY

Timed to co­in­cide with the 30th an­niver­sary of John Len­non’s death, Nowhere Boy, a biopic di­rected by Sam Tay­lor-Wood and star­ring ac­tor Aaron John­son, paints a por­trait of the artist as a trou­bled young man in Liver­pool, por­tray­ing him as a self-know­ing ge­nius from an early age. The trailer makes the film seem as if it’s can­on­iz­ing its sub­ject while preach­ing to the con­verted. Then again, when it comes to Len­non, who isn’t among the con­verted? Rated R. 98 min­utes. Re­gal DeVargas, Santa Fe;

Sto­ry­teller, Taos. (Not re­viewed)

STRAIGHT TO HELL RE­TURNS

Alex Cox’s 1987 homage to spaghetti West­erns was roasted by con­tem­po­rary crit­ics, but time has treated it well. Four bank rob­bers on the lam try to hide out in an iso­lated desert town that is over­run by ban­dits, politi­cos, gun­men, goons, and other weirdos. Its once-in-a-life­time cast in­cludes Elvis Costello, Joe Strum­mer, Dick Rude (who co-wrote the script), Den­nis Hop­per, Court­ney Love, Jim Jar­musch, and Grace Jones. 7:30 p.m. Thurs­day, Nov. 11, only. Cox in­tro­duces the film, which con­tains footage cut from the orig­i­nal the­atri­cal re­lease. Rated R. 90 min­utes. CCA Cine­math­eque, Santa Fe. (Robert Nott) See story, page 42.

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