OPEN­ING THIS WEEK

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ANO­MA­L­ISA

Rated R. 90 min­utes. Vi­o­let Crown. See re­view, Page 32.

THE BOY

An Amer­i­can nanny (Lau­ren Co­han) is hired for a job in a re­mote English vil­lage and finds that her charge is ac­tu­ally a life-size doll. At first, this seems like an easy, if ex­tremely weird, as­sign­ment. It be­comes more chal­leng­ing when she sus­pects that the boy is alive — and evil. Rated PG-13. 98 min­utes. Re­gal DeVar­gas; Re­gal Sta­dium 14; Dream­Catcher. (Not re­viewed)

BOY AND THE WORLD

Rated PG. 80 min­utes. Cen­ter for Con­tem­po­rary Arts. See re­view, Page 30.

CHI-RAQ

Spike Lee’s adap­ta­tion of Aristo­phanes’ Ly­sis­trata, set against the gang vi­o­lence of Chicago’s En­gle­wood neigh­bor­hood, is writ­ten en­tirely in rhyming verse. It’s an ef­fec­tive con­ceit that makes this art­ful but flawed un­apolo­getic polemic not only watch­able, but riv­et­ing. Ly­sis­trata (Tey­onah Par­ris) or­ga­nizes a neigh­bor­hood sex strike to stop gang vi­o­lence and drive-by shoot­ings that dec­i­mate fam­i­lies. Per­for­mances are strong, al­though Chicago serves more as a stage set than a liv­ing city. Rated R. 127 min­utes. Cen­ter for Con­tem­po­rary Arts. (Jen­nifer Levin)

DIRTY GRANDPA

Robert De Niro plays Dick Kelly, a smirk­ing old-timer who makes in­ap­pro­pri­ate com­ments to women who are a frac­tion of his age. Af­ter his wife passes away, Dick tricks his grand­son (Zac Efron) into tak­ing him to Florida for spring break. Rated R. 102 min­utes. Re­gal Sta­dium 14; Vi­o­let Crown; Dream­Catcher. (Not re­viewed)

THE 5TH WAVE

In this film adap­ta­tion of the young-adult novel of the same ti­tle, Earth has been hit by four waves of alien at­tacks, which have left the planet nearly en­tirely de­stroyed. With the fifth one loom­ing, young Cassie (Chloë Grace Moretz) — one of the few re­main­ing sur­vivors — at­tempts to res­cue her five-year-old brother (Zackary Arthur) from an alien camp. She meets a boy her age (Alex Roe), and to­gether they set out to save her brother, and per­haps the world. Rated PG-13. 112 min­utes. Re­gal Sta­dium 14; Vi­o­let Crown; Dream­Catcher. (Not re­viewed)

IP MAN 3

This se­ries fo­cuses on the life of Ip Man, the man who pop­u­lar­ized the Wing Chun ver­sion of kung fu and even taught Bruce Lee. Per­haps be­cause of le­gal com­pli­ca­tions that pre­vent the film­mak­ers from telling Lee’s part of the story (Chan Kwok Kwan does play Lee in a small role), the movies spin a fa­ble that is partly bi­o­graph­i­cal and mostly fan­tasy. This time around, Ip Man (Don­nie Yen) de­fends his son’s school from gang­sters and faces a ri­val (Zhang Jin) who wants to be known as the Wing Chun mas­ter. Ip Man 3 pops with color and some vi­brant fight se­quences, but is blandly goofy — the fight scene with Mike Tyson is not even the sil­li­est mo­ment — and awk­wardly staged. Rated PG-13. 105 min­utes. In English and Can­tonese with sub­ti­tles. Re­gal DeVar­gas. (Robert Ker)

MOON­WALK­ERS

Rated R. 107 min­utes. The Screen. See re­view, Page 30.

MOUN­TAIN

11 a.m. Sun­day, Jan. 24, only, pre­sented by

the Santa Fe Jewish Film Fes­ti­val. Not rated. 83 min­utes. In He­brew with sub­ti­tles. Cen­ter of Con­tem­po­rary Arts. See re­view, Page 33.

NA­TIONAL THEATRE LIVE: LES LI­AISONS DAN­GEREUSES

This stag­ing of Les Li­aisons Dan­gereuses — Christo­pher Hamp­ton’s adap­ta­tion of Choder­los de La­c­los’ 1782 novel — is broad­cast from Lon­don’s Don­mar Ware­house. Elaine Cas­sidy, Janet McTeer, and Do­minic West star in the cel­e­brated story of lust, se­duc­tion, and re­venge. Josie Rourke di­rects. 7 p.m. Thurs­day, Jan. 28. Len­sic Per­form­ing Arts Cen­ter. (Not re­viewed)

NOTH­ING BUT THE TRUTH

Screens with Red Car­pet Burn, 5 and 7:45 p.m. Mon­day, Jan. 25, only. Q & As with film­maker Mark Steven Shep­herd fol­low screen­ings. Rated R. 108 min­utes. Jean Cocteau Cinema. See story, Page 28.

ORION: THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING

Not rated. 86 min­utes. Jean Cocteau Cinema. See Ter­rell’s Tune-Up, Page 14.

RED CAR­PET BURN

Mark Steven Shep­herd wrote and di­rected this off­beat doc­u­men­tary about the com­mod­i­fi­ca­tion of celebrity and its man­i­fes­ta­tion in the tra­di­tion of — and pub­lic ob­ses­sion with — the red car­pet at awards shows and film fes­ti­vals. The first-per­son film is clever and cyn­i­cal in its de­pic­tion of fame wor­ship­pers who pay for sem­i­nars on how to get their faces in the pub­lic eye by crash­ing red car­pets with no cre­den­tials, just try­ing to get their pic­ture taken. Shep­herd’s ul­ti­mate goal is to use the ad­vice he gath­ers to get comely un­known teenagers onto the red car­pet, first at the Academy Awards and then at Cannes, and to get the press to pay at­ten­tion, us­ing the right com­bi­na­tion of youth­ful fem­i­nine ap­peal, a unique and fan­tas­tic evening gown, and ba­sic hubris. No one es­capes his droll ridicule — not even the red car­pets them­selves, which range from plush and blocks-long to crim­son bath­mats from dis­count stores. Screens with Noth­ing but the Truth , 5 and 7:45 p.m. Mon­day, Jan. 25, only. Q & As with Shep­herd fol­low screen­ings. Not rated. 61 min­utes. Jean Cocteau Cinema. (Jen­nifer Levin) See story, Page 28.

SYN­CHRONIC­ITY

Rated R. 101 min­utes. Jean Cocteau Cinema. See re­view, Page 31.

THE WIND­ING STREAM

Not rated. 90 min­utes. The Screen. See Ter­rell’s Tune-Up, Page 14.

Brush up your Aristo­phanes: Tey­onah Har­ris, cen­ter, in Spike Lee’s Chi-Raq, at Cen­ter for Con­tem­po­rary Arts

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