This year’s show is as much about the forces that threaten Santa Fe from be­yond its bor­ders as it is the peo­ple who live within it.

Pasatiempo - - PASA REVIEWS - Will and Grace’s

A tra­di­tion stretch­ing back to 1918, the an­nual melo­drama is the work of an anony­mous group of writers who take aim at what makes the City Dif­fer­ent so dif­fer­ent and, well, so ob­nox­ious (at times). This year’s show is as much about the forces that threaten Santa Fe from be­yond its bor­ders as it is the peo­ple who live within it. Set in 1917, the play con­jures up a world in which Pres­i­dent Woodrow Wilson has taken to gov­ern­ing by brief, bom­bas­tic procla­ma­tions in the style of our own present-day Twit­ter-ob­sessed leader. He dis­patches one Boris Kofveve, played by Jerry Fer­rac­cio, to whip the City Dif­fer­ent into shape after its coun­cil adopts an im­mi­grant-friendly “san­guichary” pol­icy.

While Kofveve claims to be from Texas, his thick East­ern Euro­pean ac­cent and fre­quent ref­er­ences to Rus­sia leave lo­cals sus­pect­ing oth­er­wise. But he finds an ally in Gov. Boozeanna Mar­ti­nis, played by Libby King, who comes off as a com­bi­na­tion of Cruella de Vil and Karen Walker. On his side, too, is city coun­cil mem­ber Sa­van­nah Scan­de­lara. Played by Katie John­son, Scan­de­lara fi­nances her gam­bling habit by pil­fer­ing funds from the pub­lic schools.

Con­ve­niently for Mar­ti­nis, the ac­tion un­folds in the Río Drama Dance Hall, where the city gov­ern­ment has set up shop after the feds cut off its fund­ing over the sanc­tu­ary city pol­icy. It’s not long be­fore Mar­ti­nis uses her veto power to wipe out other monies for the municipality.

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