Bug­ging out Regina Sil­veira

Pasatiempo - - NEWS - REGINA SIL­VEIRA

For Mun­dus Ad­mirabilis, Regina Sil­veira’s con­tri­bu­tion to SITE Santa Fe’s Fu­ture Shock, the Brazil­ian artist adorned the ex­te­rior walls and court­yard of the newly re­mod­eled space with dozens of large black vinyl ad­he­sive in­sects. But­ter­flies, grasshoppers, dragonflies, and bee­tles — some as big as killer whales — act as won­der­fully weird wall­pa­per, where their hy­per­re­al­is­tic sil­hou­ettes will be on view for sev­eral months be­fore they alight on their next des­ti­na­tion.

Like many of Fu­ture Shock’s ex­hibitors, Sil­veira works in many dis­ci­plines. In ad­di­tion to dig­i­tal­im­age and video-pro­jec­tion in­stal­la­tions, Sil­veira has made sculp­ture, holog­ra­phy, porce­lain, mag­nif­i­cently drawn M.C. Escher-es­que ge­o­met­ri­cal works on pa­per, and even vir­tual re­al­ity projects. In works like 2005’s In­tro, the artist em­ployed the same black vinyl ad­he­sive she used for Mun­dus Ad­mirabilis, cov­er­ing the walls, floors, win­dows, and even the ther­mo­stat of a Brus­sels mu­seum with thou­sands of black ad­he­sive vinyl foot­prints, trans­form­ing a reg­u­lar­look­ing build­ing into some­thing ut­terly un­ex­pected.

For Mun­dus Ad­mirabilis, the artist was in­spired by metic­u­lous ren­der­ings of in­sects in pre-pho­to­graphic nat­u­ral his­tory pub­li­ca­tions. The work was orig­i­nally ex­hib­ited in 2007 as part of Gar­den of Power, an in­stal­la­tion in Brasilia, Brazil. Later, it trav­eled to São Paolo — where the artist lives and works — and Poland. In a statement on Sil­veira’s web­site, she de­scribed her mo­ti­va­tions for Mun­dus Ad­mirabilis as fol­lows: “The re­vis­ited pests would be non­lin­ear metaphors of the much more fu­ri­ous pests that now plague us glob­ally on sev­eral fronts: so­cial, en­vi­ron­men­tal, cul­tural and ‘civ­i­liz­ing,’ threat­en­ing a fu­ture that seems more and more in­fea­si­ble.” The piece may ref­er­ence dark themes — for ex­am­ple, bib­li­cal plagues, of which Mun­dus Ad­mirabilis would be one of es­pe­cially epic pro­por­tions — but they don’t take away from the sheer de­light of the work, so bug-fear­ers need not worry. Sil­veira’s mag­nif­i­cent black vinyl crea­tures in­spire awe and de­light; they’re en­gross­ing, not gross. — Iris McLis­ter

REGINA SIL­VEIRA ADORNED THE EX­TE­RIOR WALLS AND COURT­YARD OF THE NEWLY RE­MOD­ELED SPACE WITH DOZENS OF LARGE BLACK VINYL AD­HE­SIVE IN­SECTS. BUT­TER­FLIES, GRASSHOPPERS, DRAGONFLIES, AND BEE­TLES ACT AS WON­DER­FULLY WEIRD WALL­PA­PER.

Mun­dus Ad­mirabilis, in­stal­la­tion view, 2007; photo Gabriela Cam­pos / The New Mex­i­can

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