A LONG STAY IN THUN­DER BAY

Passage Maker - - Electronics Products -

We ar­rived in Thun­der Bay, tired and strung out. I was anx­ious about be­ing in an un­fa­mil­iar ma­rina in a dif­fer­ent coun­try, the new­ness of clear­ing cus­toms (which ac­tu­ally con­sisted of a 10-minute phone call), and man­ag­ing our three small crew mem­bers. The har­bor master told us that if we stayed seven nights in the ma­rina, we could get a dis­count. On the spot, we agreed and handed over the credit card.

About two hours later once we had set­tled in and re­laxed a bit, we re­gret­ted the de­ci­sion made so quickly. I didn’t want to be in a city, I wanted to be at a re­mote wilder­ness an­chor­age, like the pre­vi­ous night we had spent at Clark Bay, the last an­chor­age be­fore round­ing Pi­geon Point into Canada. I pre­fer the soli­tude of think­ing we were the only peo­ple in the world. In Clark Bay, we had spent the night lis­ten­ing to the loons and the zom­bie-like mos­qui­toes pound­ing at the tightly sealed win­dows and doors and feel­ing the thick, white Milky Way above our heads. Now we were in a me­trop­o­lis of more than 100,000 peo­ple for an en­tire week? We could al­ways leave early, but we were still out the money. And how had we made that de­ci­sion so quickly, any­way?

In the end, stay­ing a week in Thun­der Bay worked out fine. The wind and waves were high most days, and small-craft ad­vi­sories

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