ET TU ANADARKO, ET TU?

THE IDES OF MARCH WHIT­TLE AWAY AT THE LO­CAL MID­DLE CLASS

Public News (Houston) - - FRONT PAGE -

It was like a tor­nado warn­ing, it came, it took and then it went. Then a few more tor­na­dos like the first, they came, they took, they went. Life went on, just with fewer peo­ple. The tor­na­dos were called Anadarko, Chevron, Exxon and Shell. Rip­ping apart at the fab­ric of the com­mu­nity, namely the mid­dle class work­ers at these com­pa­nies. The deep pock­ets of the ex­ec­u­tive class were spared, af­ter all, how would they pay for their ex­tra homes, lux­u­ri­ous va­ca­tions, pri­vate schools and <cough> ladies in wait­ing <cough>?

Granted, I’m not a Bernie San­ders fan, but the Demo-so­cial­ist makes an in­ter­est­ing point. The mid­dle class is shrink­ing. Shrink­ing at the hands of the ex­ec­u­tives of these com­pa­nies fig­ur­ing out how to trim the fat with­out touch­ing their own wal­let in dire eco­nomic times. Eco­nomic times, mind you, that were cre­ated over 16 years since 9-11. Some fea­tures of this bad econ­omy were cre­ated through the fear-mon­ger­ing among the po­lit­i­cal class. Some by the bad poli­cies gen­er­ated by the ex­ec­u­tive branch and the Demo­cratic rul­ing class. And now, fol­low­ing through the self-in­ter­est/self­p­reser­va­tion moves of those who can af­ford to cut fat where the fat can’t touch them.

The poor and mid­dle class are sorely caught in the cross-hairs, nowhere to turn, nowhere to go.

And, with that, the lo­cal mom and pop shops that are pre­ferred by the mid­dle class strug­gle to find new cus­tomers. Strug­gle is good, but not when the strug­gle was never nec­es­sary in the first place. How many deep pock­ets ex­ec­u­tives could have cut their salaries and saved a few hun­dred jobs? Saved the lo­cal econ­omy. Saved the mid­dle class. I hope and pray that these thoughts cross their minds the next time a wave of em­ploy­ment cuts are needed to be made. Let’s save the mid­dle class.

On A Per­sonal Note:

The last few months you may have been won­der­ing what hap­pened to the Pub­lic News. And what hap­pened and where it hap­pened was with me, the pub­lisher, edi­tor, lay­out guy, ad sales, et al.

I got very sick, so sick I could not spend much time on the pa­per, with­out be­ing in­terupted to take care of things.

I suf­fer from di­a­betes, and di­a­betic com­pli­ca­tions come and go. Mine de­cided to stay and is still here with me. I’m just learn­ing to man­age it.

I ap­pre­ci­ate all the prayers and con­cerns, ex­pe­cially when I an­nounced the ill­ness on my per­sonal Face­book page.

Your love, con­cerns and prayers have sus­tained me along with a trust that the God of the Uni­verse is not un­aware of all this and knows what He is do­ing with me.

All things work­ing to­gether for the good. It’s good to be back!

Ken Petty

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