Re­quired Ma­te­ri­als:

RC Car Action - - DIY -

- A POT BIG ENOUGH TO FIT WHAT YOU ARE DYE­ING

- A PAIR OF TONGS

- HOT WA­TER THER­MOME­TER

- WA­TER - RIT DYE (LIQ­UID OR DYE POW­DER)

- ITEM YOU WISH TO AS A STOVE

- HEAT SOURCE, SUCH

- PA­PER TOWEL

Step 1

Boil Wa­ter/dye Mix­ture Bring a mix­ture of half a tea­spoon of pow­dered Rit Dye per cup of wa­ter to a boil. We also use liq­uid Rit Dye, which is is about twice as con­cen­trated so mix your wa­ter and dye mix­ture ac­cord­ingly. Make sure that there is enough mix­ture to cover the items that you are dye­ing.

Step 2

Bring the mix­ture to a tem­per­a­ture be­tween 150 to 175 de­grees Fahren­heit. Any hot­ter isn’t nec­es­sary for the dye to take ef­fect and ex­cess heat can dam­age the item be­ing dyed.

Step 3

Us­ing a pair of tongs, slowly sub­merge your item into the heated mix­ture. Be care­ful not to splash the mix­ture as it will burn your skin and stain your cook­ing sur­face. Dunk the part in and out of the mix­ture ev­ery minute.

Step 4

Keep a close eye for color changes and watch for the tone that you are look­ing to achieve. This might take any­where from one to twenty min­utes, de­pend­ing on the plas­tic you are dye­ing. Be warned, some ma­te­ri­als don’t take dye well and may not get the deep or rich color you seek. This is why prac­tic­ing with a scrap piece is a good idea.

Step 5

Once the item be­comes the color you want, pull it out and pat it dry with a clean pa­per towel or cloth. Be care­ful, the plas­tic sur­face will be very hot. Do not han­dle with your bare hands. Also pay at­ten­tion not to splash, you’re work­ing with very hot wa­ter that can in­jure or per­ma­nently stain sur­faces and cloth­ing.

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