SEE/HEAR/DO

HOW TO SPEND YOUR DOWN TIME.

Seabourn Club Herald - - IN THIS ISSUE -

Se­abourn sug­gests how to spend your down time.

SOUTH: THE IL­LUS­TRATED STORY OF SHACKLETON’S LAST EXPEDITION 1914-1917, BY SIR ERNEST HENRY SHACKLETON (ZENITH PRESS).

Sir Ernest Shackleton never knew when to quit.t. Five years af­ter earn­ing his knight­hood for ven­tur­ing fur­ther south than any hu­man had ever gone, he re­turned to Antarc­tica – this time, me, to cross the White Con­ti­nent, jour­ney­ing from the At­lantic to the Pa­cific via the South Pole. His first-per­son ac­count of the Im­pe­rial Trans-Antarc­tic arc­tic Expedition – the sink­ing of their ship, En­durance,nce, and sub­se­quent year and a half spent camp­ingg on an ice floe and raft­ing to South Ge­or­gia Is­landd – re­mains a stun­ning, stir­ring story of survival: “We had one wa­ter-tight tin of matches. I had stowed away in a pocket, in readi­ness for a sunny day, a lens from one of the tele­scopes, but this was of no use dur­ing the voy­age. The sun sel­dom shone upon us.” His mat­ter-of-fact de­scrip­tions be­come even more mov­ing when read along­side the pho­tos and paint­ings of expedition mem­bers Frank Hur­ley and Ge­orge Marston. This new edi­tion in­cludes maps and mod­ern color pho­to­graphs of the land and sea in which Shackleton and his crew bat­tled the el­e­ments and ul­ti­mately emerged vic­to­ri­ous.

THE CAVES OF ARUBA

For an is­land fa­mous for its sun­shine, some of Aruba’s most strik­ing features are hid­den un­der­ground. Be­low the enor­mous na­ture pre­serve of Arikok Na­tional Park lie three es­pe­cially strik­ing cav­erns. Guadirikiri Cave is laced with nat­u­ral “sky­lights” – ac­cord­ing to leg­end, where a pair of im­pris­oned Arawak lovers burst through the rocky ground to live hap­pily ever af­ter. The wind­ing, 300-foot-long Huliba Cave is known as the “Tun­nel of Love” for its nar­row pas­sages and heart-shaped en­trance. And the walls of Fon­tein Cave are dec­o­rated with Arawak paint­ings and pet­ro­glyphs made 2,000 years ago.

I WALKED ABROAD, BY PREMO & GUSTAVSSON

Two mu­si­cians with dif­fer­ent roots – fid­dler and banjo-player Lau­rel Premo of Red March Ris­ing and ny­ck­el­harpa vir­tu­oso Anna Gustavsson – put their tal­ents to­gether to cre­ate a trans-At­lantic bridge be­tween Amer­i­can blue­grass and tra­di­tional Swedish folk mu­sic. The trip be­tween the two worlds is more than worth­while. Song ti­tles like “Han­nah at the Spring­house” and “Omvända Val­låt­spol­skan” might tip off a lis­tener to the cul­tural blend pre­sented by th­ese in­spired play­ers, but it’s only af­ter lis­ten­ing to the largely in­stru­men­tal tracks that one re­al­izes not how dif­fer­ent they are, but how much the same. The haunt­ing lilt of “Nostal­gipol­ska” fits right along­side their ren­di­tion of the Ap­palachian clas­sic “Sally in the Gar­den.”

It’s strange to think that mu­sic that sounds as fa­mil­iar as a vin­tage post­card could also be so ground­break­ing at heart, but there it is. A good tune is uni­ver­sal.

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