CEVICHE TRAV­ELS

CEL­E­BRAT­ING THE SEAFOOD-AND-LIME DISH, EV­ERY­WHERE IT’S SERVED

Seabourn Club Herald - - CUISINES OF THE WORLD - By Kevin Revolin­ski

While teach­ing English in Panama, I’d re­li­giously stop in each evening at my cor­ner mar­ket, Bodega Mi Amiga, which re­ceived daily plas­tic con­tain­ers of some of the best raw fish pre­pared only by soak­ing with lemon juice. This was my first in­tro­duc­tion to ceviche and it was love at first bite. My ex­cuse was I needed more of those handy con­tain­ers for left­overs at home. A pint or three of ceviche and a cou­ple sleeves of saltine crack­ers brought friends to­gether around a ta­ble. At the fresh-seafood mar­ket, you could buy a two-dol­lar Sty­ro­foam cup of spicy ceviche as a pick-me-up in the morn­ing. Bet­ter than cof­fee. “Makes you strong,” the vendor would tell me with a wink.

From Mex­ico to Chile, and from high­lands of Gu­atemala, I’ve eaten the Caribbean is­lands to the this de­lec­ta­ble dish of fresh seafood in fine restau­rants, mom-and-pop shops and beach­side shacks. In the 21st cen­tury, ceviche has moved be­yond Latin Amer­i­can restau­rants and can be found as an ap­pe­tizer in high-end kitchens around the world. But in the lands of its ori­gin — Latin Amer­ica and the Caribbean — it’s still very much a go-to ap­pe­tizer, or even an un­pre­ten­tious main course.

NEI­THER RAW NOR COOKED

The univer­sal con­cept be­hind all the dif­fer­ent types of ceviches is “cook­ing” seafood with­out heat but rather employing acidic citrus juice. When food is cooked by heat, the struc­ture of some of the pro­teins is al­tered, a process gen­er­ally known as “de­nat­u­ra­tion.” This is why meat changes tex­ture when cooked, or an egg turns white and

THE UNIVER­SAL CON­CEPT BE­HIND ALL CEVICHES IS “COOK­ING” SEAFOOD WITH­OUT HEAT, EMPLOYING ACIDIC CITRUS JUICE.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.