COOL GEAR FOR COLD TIMES

WHAT YOU BRING CAN MAKE OR BREAK YOUR TRIP.

Skiing - - Cheat Sheet -

A bad sleep­ing bag can ruin a win­ter camp­ing trip. If you’re a cold sleeper, con­sider get­ting a sleep­ing bag that’s rated 10 to 15 de­grees colder than the fore­cast low. The In­ferno’s goose down saves pre­cious pack space and weight with­out sac­ri­fic­ing warmth. [from $569; thenorth­face.com]

The North Face In­ferno -20F

Con­sist­ing of nat­u­ral, mostly raw in­gre­di­ents, Pro Bars stay soft in cold temps while other bars turn into mo­lar-cracking pieces of slate. The mix of carbs, fats, and pro­teins helps fight heat loss and main­tain en­ergy dur­ing long, calo­rie-in­ten­sive days.

[$4; thep­ro­bar.com] Re­li­able in the cold and at el­e­va­tion, the Sumo is ideal for small-group win­ter camp­ing. Weigh­ing in at just a pound, the 1.8-liter sys­tem takes the guess­work out of cook­ing and snowmelt needs.

[$130; jet­boil.com]

Pro Bar Whole­berry Blast

Jet­boil Sumo

Smart­Wool PhD Back­coun­try

Socks are crit­i­cal. Cold feet can ruin any day in the back­coun­try. The PhD Back­coun­try is de­signed to bet­ter wick the ex­tra sweat caused by tour­ing, and ex­tra elas­tic keeps them from slid­ing around on your foot. Keep your feet dry, com­fort­able, and happy. [$30; smart­wool.com]

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