SOME­TIMES IT’S BEST TO TRUST THE PRO­FES­SION­ALS

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OWN­ING AND DRIV­ING A CUS­TOM TRUCK IS NOTH­ING SHORT OF PURE AWESOMENESS. None of us like to dis­ap­pear into the crowd, and hav­ing a wicked ride ex­presses our in­di­vid­u­al­ity. Own­ing a cus­tom truck is re­ward­ing, es­pe­cially when on­look­ers stare in amaze­ment. So how do you get from stock to stun­ner?

I think it’s a good idea to work on your own ride as much as pos­si­ble, pri­mar­ily be­cause it’s the only way to truly know your truck’s strengths and weak­nesses. You don’t have to be a mas­ter me­chanic or pro cus­tom fab­ri­ca­tor to do at least some work your­self. Most of us can’t do it all though, and even some pro cus­tomiz­ers sub­con­tract cer­tain jobs to spe­cial­ists. Never be ashamed to rely on other sources to get a job done.

To build or not to build can be a tough sub­ject for many of us to deal with, es­pe­cially if you’re some­one who likes to tackle things on their own. We can be stub­born, and some­times we might try to work out a so­lu­tion that’s a lit­tle over our heads. This can go ei­ther way: You might learn a new skill, or you could get out of your depth. Be­fore try­ing some­thing new, know your lim­its.

It can be re­ward­ing to work on your own truck, but we shouldn’t think less of any­one who’s paid some­one else to do some or all of the work on their cus­tom ride. The whole idea of “built not bought” has al­ways struck me as lim­it­ing. Not ev­ery­one knows how to build trucks, and we shouldn’t treat some­one badly be­cause they don’t have the nec­es­sary skillset. I think any­one who can af­ford to have their dream ve­hi­cle built with­out get­ting a fin­ger dirty is pretty lucky, ac­tu­ally.

There are other as­pects be­side skills to con­sider when de­cid­ing whether or not to do a job your­self. The main one is time. High­qual­ity builds take time re­gard­less of how much cash you have in your bank ac­count. You may hear about trucks that were built in a few months’ time for a show, but that’s be­cause th­ese builds were crammed into a short sched­ule with peo­ple work­ing around the clock. Of­ten, th­ese trucks aren’t com­pletely fin­ished by the time they’re fea­tured at a show or in a mag­a­zine, and it might take an­other full year to button them up fully. If you don’t have a lot of time to work on your truck, it’s best to trust pro­fes­sion­als that can get the job done quickly and well.

An­other thing that can af­fect your truck’s out­come is pick­ing a shop that’s helmed by ex­perts. We’ve heard our fair share of night­mares, and to avoid be­com­ing a statis­tic, it’s im­por­tant to do your re­search. Assess a shop’s rep­u­ta­tion, and talk to peo­ple who’ve had work done at any shop you’re con­sid­er­ing. One of the many great things about the truck scene is that we are very open about shar­ing our ex­pe­ri­ences.

Take ad­van­tage of this, and learn from your peers, but be care­ful not to take any short­cuts. We’re fa­mil­iar with sub­stan­dard trucks that were built be­cause some­one got a “buddy deal.” Re­mem­ber, good work ain’t cheap and cheap work ain’t good.

In the end, what re­ally counts is the level of char­ac­ter be­hind a ride. If some­one can buy their way into own­ing a show­stop­per and is cool to hang around with, why hate on him? Let’s just ap­pre­ci­ate th­ese trucks for what they are while we have fun hang­ing out with other like-minded folks. Cus­tom trucks are a com­mon bond, but it’s the peo­ple that make our com­mu­nity a pos­i­tive place for ev­ery­one to en­joy.

LET’S JUST AP­PRE­CI­ATE TH­ESE TRUCKS FOR WHAT THEY ARE WHILE WE HAVE FUN HANG­ING OUT WITH OTHER LIKE-MINDED FOLKS. CUS­TOM TRUCKS ARE A COM­MON BOND, BUT IT’S THE PEO­PLE THAT MAKE OUR COM­MU­NITY A POS­I­TIVE PLACE FOR EV­ERY­ONE TO EN­JOY.”

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