A Fam­ily Project Gone Wild

Street Trucks - - TIME CAPSULE - TEXT BY MIKE SELF PHOTOS BY ROBERT MCGAFFIN AND STRANGE MO­TION

BACK IN 2008, TERRY AND SARA ROSE (ALONG WITH SARA’S DAD) PUR­CHASED A DE­CENT BUT WELL-WORN ’68 CHEVY C-10 AS A FAM­ILY PROJECT AND AS A BIT OF A CEL­E­BRA­TION FOR A FEW RE­CENT MILESTONES. They had just moved back to Ten­nessee to be closer to fam­ily, their first son, Tyler, was turn­ing one, and they were ex­pect­ing the birth of their younger son, Colton, at any mo­ment. Life was great, and what bet­ter way to cel­e­brate than to spend some qual­ity time to­gether in the garage?

Well, as any­one with young kids can at­test, they tend to take up a lot of time—in a good way, of course. Nev­er­the­less, that C-10 ended up tak­ing a back seat to a cou­ple of baby seats, and al­though the truck got as far as get­ting stripped down for a redo, that’s where the story ended for a long while.

As fate would have it, Terry even­tu­ally was in­tro­duced to a very prom­i­nent mem­ber of the cus­tom truck and car com­mu­nity, Tim Strange of Strange Mo­tion, while Tim’s TV show “Search and Re­store” was film­ing. Terry is the busi­ness man­ager for Red Kap, the cloth­ing com­pany that makes all of those awe­some shop uni­forms for us folks who get greasy for work and/or plea­sure, so it was a friend­ship just wait­ing to hap­pen.

Of course, at some point, the topic turned to the Rose fam­ily’s C-10 and how that poor ol’ truck had just been sit­ting for ages (go­ing on six years, in fact). We all know that the only wasted truck is one that doesn’t get driven, so Terry started to re­al­ize that the truck wasn’t go­ing to build it­self. Some­times de­ci­sions have to be made to en­sure that a project doesn’t end up rot­ting be­hind a barn due to a case of good in­ten­tions but not enough time.

Some time in 2014, Terry fi­nally de­liv­ered the truck to Strange Mo­tion, where Tim be­gan plan­ning things out like a painter siz­ing up his next mas­ter­piece. Terry and Tim both had plenty of ideas and now it was time to put those ideas to­gether into the form of a truck. The orig­i­nal con­cept was to re­store the truck, then go from there. The vast ex­tent of this project, how­ever, wouldn’t re­veal it­self un­til much later, when the truck even­tu­ally earned its nick­name, Domino. You know, as in the “domino ef­fect.”

Af­ter about a year, the truck’s progress was eval­u­ated, and Tim put some­thing on the ta­ble that would def­i­nitely speed things up and take things to an­other level: He wanted to de­but the truck at SEMA. Fur­ther­more, Tim wanted to go full-blown pro-tour­ing on the truck, which meant it would need much more than a pretty face.

The evolution of this build is as­tound­ing, and suffice it to say that in the end the Roses’ Chevy went through much more than a sim­ple restoration. In fact, to ac­tu­ally spell out every­thing that has been done to Terry’s truck would de­prive you of any photos, be­cause we just wouldn’t have room for any.

THE EVOLUTION OF THIS BUILD IS AS­TOUND­ING, AND SUFFICE IT TO SAY THAT IN THE END THE ROSES’ CHEVY WENT THROUGH MUCH MORE THAN A SIM­PLE RESTORATION.”

By the time the fi­nal de­sign was laid out, there were just seven months left un­til SEMA, which meant thou­sands of hours in the shop and some help from some friends in the in­dus­try. The chas­sis was com­pletely over­hauled with the best sus­pen­sion com­po­nents Scott’s Hotrods had to of­fer, with splined sway bars and Ride­tech coilovers tak­ing care of the han­dling. Of course, that’s the sim­ple ver­sion of what was done, but in re­al­ity, Tim put tons more work into it with more than 100 feet of round tub­ing and ad­di­tional stiff­en­ing. The re­sult is noth­ing short of art. With the Wil­wood brakes and Nutek forged wheels bolted on, the chas­sis was ready to touch pave­ment.

Dur­ing this phase of the build, Terry was still try­ing to de­cide what he wanted un­der the hood, but with the clock tick­ing he de­cided on a GM LS3 from Pace Per­for­mance, which was good for 525-hp right out of the crate. You’d think that would be enough to satisfy any­one’s power crav­ings, but Terry de­cided that the top of the en­gine was too plain for his taste, so a Mag­nu­son in­ter­cooled su­per­charger setup made quick work of that par­tic­u­lar prob­lem. As you can see, how­ever, there is a lot more to the en­gine bay than a sim­ple crate en­gine and blower, ev­ery single as­pect of the en­gine bay was customized be­yond be­lief. Ex­haust du­ties were han­dled

with the aid of a Flowmaster man­drel-bent tub­ing kit, which al­lowed Tim to cre­ate the per­fect run of tub­ing out to the back with a pair of HP-2 muf­flers.

The ex­te­rior was also sliced up in var­i­ous ways, some ob­vi­ous and oth­ers not so much. For in­stance, a keen eye might no­tice that the fac­tory rain gut­ters were shaved and re­placed with new ver­sions fabbed from round rod, but how many of us would have no­ticed that the top was de­crowned and chopped down ¾ inch? Well, just as the story goes with the rest of the truck, that was just the be­gin­ning of the mods list. The bumpers were cut and sec­tioned eight dif­fer­ent ways, and to­ward the rear, the bed was widened in a wedge fash­ion to elim­i­nate the fac­tory wedge that ran the other di­rec­tion. Ev­ery single body panel, whether it was new or orig­i­nal to the truck, was mod­i­fied or hand-formed in some way to flow with one an­other, whether it was ex­tend­ing the lip be­low the grille, or re­shap­ing the front and rear glass ar­eas in or­der to flush-mount every­thing, or tons of other stuff in be­tween. When it was fi­nally time for some color, Tim laid on a cus­tom mix of

PLACED FRONT AND CEN­TER IN THE FLOWMASTER MUF­FLERS BOOTH, IT DREW CROWDS ALL WEEK LONG AND EVEN RE­CEIVED SONY GRAND TURISMO’S AWARD FOR BEST TRUCK OF SEMA.”

Medium Blue Pearl Me­tal­lic from Ax­alta Refin­ish, while the bumpers were fin­ished in a satin char­coal.

Mov­ing to where Terry and Sara would even­tu­ally be spend­ing the most time, Tim widened a 1955-59-era Chevy truck dash to fit be­tween the A-pil­lars and wrapped its edges to blend into the doors, then ex­tended it down 9 inches for a cleaner look and to make room for the Old Air Prod­ucts AC con­trols and vents. Al­though Terry was pretty much open to any­thing Tim wanted to do, he did re­quest that he stick with us­ing the fac­to­ry­op­tion Buddy Bucket seats, which in­cor­po­rate a jump seat be­tween the two main buck­ets. Tim’s part­ner in crime and life, Car­rie Strange, took care of up­hol­stery du­ties, which also in­cluded cov­er­ing the hand-formed door pan­els and head­liner to per­fectly com­ple­ment the rest of the char­coal on the truck.

Chris Robin­son then took the reins for a bit in or­der to in­stall a mul­ti­tude of Kicker speak­ers in cus­tom pan­els, as well as a Kicker au­dio con­troller and am­pli­fiers, be­fore hand­ing it back to Strange Mo­tion for fi­nal assem­bly and cleanup be­fore pack­ing the truck up for SEMA, where it was eas­ily one of the most talked about ve­hi­cles of the show. Placed front and cen­ter in the Flowmaster Muf­flers booth, it drew crowds all week long and even re­ceived Sony Grand Turismo’s award for Best Truck of SEMA. Shortly af­ter, the truck also picked up the Builder’s Choice award at the Goodguys’ Colum­bus event.

We re­ally weren’t sur­prised by th­ese ac­co­lades since Tim is a Hot Rod Hall of Fame in­ductee, but we bet it sure is nice to be rec­og­nized. The other win­ners in this build are ob­vi­ously Terry and Sara, who ac­tu­ally got to take this bad boy home. Not too shabby for a first-time, long­for­got­ten project.

TIM BUILT A COM­PLETELY NEW BED

FLOOR FOR THE TRUCK, AND PUT TO­GETHER A BED KIT US­ING BED WOOD AND PARTS’ PIECES.

IT’S DE­TAILS LIKE THE EX­TENDED FRONT BED SEC­TION THAT MAKE DOMINO ONE OF THE BADDEST TRUCKS OUT THERE.

IT’S A BIT OF A SHAME THAT THIS WORK OF ART WAS COV­ERED UP BY THE BODY, BUT IT WAS EN­GI­NEERED TO PER­FORM ON THE AUTOCROSS COURSE.

LEFT. MARQUEZ DE­SIGNS LED TAIL­LIGHTS

ARE ONLY THE BE­GIN­NING

OUT BACK. TIM STRANGE CUT AND TUCKED THE REAR BUMPER TO FIT BET­TER THAN FAC­TORY, AND THE GRANT KUSTOMS TAIL­GATE

SKIN WITH IN­TE­GRATED SPOILER RE­ALLY BRING OUT THE PRO-TOUR­ING LOOK.

WHAT DO YOU GET WHEN YOU STICK A MAG­NU­SON SU­PER­CHARGER ON TOP OF AN LS3 THAT AL­READY PUTS OUT 525 HORSES? A LOT OF FUN, THAT’S WHAT! WE THINK YOU’LL AGREE THAT THE WHOLE EN­GINE COM­PART­MENT IS NOTH­ING SHORT OF AMAZ­ING.

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