TIM­ING IS EV­ERY­THING

The Truck of his Dreams was Right Next Door

Street Trucks - - NEWS - TEXT BY KEVIN WHIPPS PHO­TOS BY IN­DEX INK

BRENT MIVELAZ OF LA CRES­CENTA, CAL­I­FOR­NIA, HAS AL­WAYS BEEN A CAR GUY. Back in the early 2000s, he owned a ’63 C-10 that IF Cus­toms laid out and con­verted from a long bed to a short bed—mi­nus an­other 2 inches. It was a clean truck, but af­ter a hit-an­drun col­li­sion to­taled it, Brent de­cided that it was time to move on. Un­for­tu­nately, life got in the way. Brent and his wife had their first child, and as any­body with kids knows, things get put on hold around that time. Af­ter all, it might be cool to eat Taco Bell every day when it’s just you, but ba­bies don’t do too well on a steady diet of seven-layer bur­ri­tos.

In the mean­time, Brent sat­is­fied his car dreams by scour­ing ebay and Craigslist for the best deals. But,

THIS HAD TO BE A SIGN. LIT­ER­ALLY HOURS BE­FORE, HIS WIFE HAD GIVEN HIM THE GREEN LIGHT TO BUY AN F-100, AS LONG AS IT WAS ON THE WEST COAST. NOW HE HAD ONE RIGHT IN FRONT OF HIM. HE JUST HAD TO CON­VINCE THE OWNER THAT HE SHOULD BE­COME THE NEXT ONE.”

noth­ing re­ally hit him quite right, un­til even­tu­ally he found a white uni­body Ford F-100 that was static-dropped and sell­ing for $8,000. Thing was, it was clear across the coun­try, and even though he and his wife loved road trips, that was a lit­tle ex­treme. In­stead, on a Fri­day af­ter­noon, Brent’s wife told him, “If you can find one of those out here, then let’s buy it.”

Later that day, he took the fam­ily out for din­ner in nearby Bur­bank. Since there’s his­tory all over the place out there, they de­cided to cruise around some of the lo­cal neigh­bor­hoods to see what they could find. As luck would have it, they turned a few cor­ners and found a bone-stock ’63 Ford uni­body just chill­ing in some­one’s drive­way.

This had to be a sign. Lit­er­ally hours be­fore, his wife had given him the green light to buy an F-100, as long as it was on the West Coast. Now he had one right in front of him. He just had to con­vince the owner that he should be­come the next one. Brent scrib­bled a quick note of­fer­ing to pur­chase the Ford, then drove home ex­cited.

His ex­cite­ment waned in the com­ing days when he didn’t re­ceive a call. Brent drove by the house a few times that week, check­ing to see if any­one had re­moved the note. By the fol­low­ing Thurs­day, some­one had, and by Fri­day, they’d made a deal. Brent handed the man $3,800 and drove the truck home with his daugh­ter in the pas­sen­ger seat. It was per­fect.

Ex­cept that it wasn’t; the truck in rough shape. The 223 straight-six with three on the tree was dogged on power, and the carb was leak­ing fuel onto the in­take man­i­fold. Although it had

only 80,000 orig­i­nal miles, the ve­hi­cle be­gan life as a cap­tain’s truck for the City of Or­ange Fire De­part­ment, so who knew whether it was metic­u­lously cared for or just left to rot. What Brent did know is that the guy he bought it from picked it up at an auc­tion in 1992. He put 12,000 miles on it through­out the next 20 years, and Brent wasn’t sure if the oil had ever been changed. But the patina was per­fect, and he loved the truck, so he fig­ured he’d deal with the prob­lems and make it his own.

The re­sults af­ter Brent got through with the truck are pretty spec­tac­u­lar, but likely quite a bit dif­fer­ent from what you’d ex­pect. Ev­ery­thing on the out­side and in­side is bone stock. That seat? Brent never re-cov­ered it, that’s just the way it was when he bought the truck. The orig­i­nal bumpers are on both ends of the frame, and it doesn’t even have car­pet. Other than the stance and a new bed kit, no one would ever know that the truck was any­thing spe­cial, not un­til they popped the hood.

As Brent told us, the truck is essen­tially a ’63 Ford on a Chevy chas­sis. The truck came with leaf springs all the way around, but af­ter a lot of work and test fits, he re­ceived the first Porter­built kit ever made for these trucks, both front and rear. The en­gine was an­other find, and it came from a 2002 Chevro­let Silverado. All he did was ditch the in­take man­i­fold and re­place it with one from an LS1, and he was good to go. All of that com­bined with an Ac­cuair e-level kit and ’bags, has made one killer Ford.

The ob­vi­ous ques­tion is what’s next? A lot of patina peo­ple ei­ther stay true to their fin­ish or go nuts and paint it. Which way is Brent lean­ing? “Patina is easy, man,” he told us. “Some peo­ple just don’t get it.” He’s right. Not ev­ery­body un­der­stands how cool it is to own a truck that’s dented, beat up and not quite per­fect, but those that do wouldn’t trade it for any­thing else.

NOT EV­ERY­BODY UN­DER­STANDS HOW COOL IT IS TO OWN A TRUCK THAT’S DENTED, BEAT UP AND NOT QUITE PER­FECT, BUT THOSE THAT DO WOULDN’T TRADE IT FOR ANY­THING ELSE.”

BE­TWEEN THE TUCKED LUGS AND THE LAID BUMPER, THE WAY THIS TRUCK SITS IS JUST PER­FECT.

ABOVE. THAT’S THE SAME BENCH SEAT THAT’S BEEN IN THE TRUCK SINCE IT WAS A PART OF THE CITY OF OR­ANGE’S FIRE DE­PART­MENT.

IF THAT GROUND-HUG­GING STANCE DOESN’T MAKE YOU FEEL WARM AND TINGLY IN­SIDE, WE DON’T KNOW WHAT’S WRONG WITH YOU.

THE CUS­TOM WOOD BED KIT IS ABOUT THE ONLY THING ON THE OUT­SIDE OF THE UNI­BODY THAT ISN’T STOCK.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.