SHOW’S OVER

A Rev­o­lu­tion­ary C-10 Build

Street Trucks - - NEWS - TEXT BY KEVIN AGUILAR PHO­TOS BY GRANT COX

SINCE THE C-10 CRAZE HAS EX­PLODED, IT’S DIF­FI­CULT TO IMAG­INE A TIME WHEN THEY WEREN’T SO COM­MON. Although some of the C-10 pi­o­neers have been over­shad­owed by new­com­ers, back when these in­no­va­tors were ex­per­i­ment­ing with clas­sic trucks, mod­i­fi­ca­tions were made on a trial-and-er­ror ba­sis. Un­like the cur­rent scene, there were no off-theshelf kits to make C-10s wicked cool. These new prod­ucts owe a debt to the cus­tomiz­ers who made them pos­si­ble by build­ing trucks like the ’68 you see here.

In­spired by the work of Bob Grant at Grant Kus­toms, Clint Pe­tree wanted to cre­ate a truck that would turn heads. He planned to drop the ’68 on the ground with an airbagged sus­pen­sion, and then have Bob work his magic on the sheet metal. If you haven’t seen Bob’s work be­fore, we can at­test to his se­ri­ous met­al­work­ing skills and his wild imag­i­na­tion.

While the truck was at Bob’s shop, the two de­vel­oped a plan to trans­form it in the vein of a ’69 Camaro. The truck’s lower body­line was deleted, and the sides were fabbed to re­sem­ble Camaro fen­ders. A new 14-gauge steel and chromed bumper was in­stalled up front, and the grille was opened up by re­cess­ing the lights. Then a cus­tom-made bil­let grille was fit into the open­ing with a solid bil­let cen­ter piece. Mov­ing back, the cen­ter sec­tion of a 2002 Silverado cowl hood was formed to the hood of the ’68. The cab cowl con­tin­ued the flow of the hood be­fore it was welded solid. The top of the cab was chopped 2 inches and sin­gle-piece side glass, flush wind­shield and back glass were in­stalled.

Other mod­i­fi­ca­tions in­clude a welded seam on the rear of the cab’s roof, which con­tinues on to the body­line. The back cor­ners of the cab were squared to min­i­mize the gap be­tween it and the bed. The bed was re-formed with smooth in­ner walls and cus­tom wheel tubs. The bed floor was also smoothed, and the shape of the hood cowl was worked into it to show off the rear sus­pen­sion. The tail­gate was re­moved and Bob made a cus­tom combo skin with a cen­ter peak be­fore weld­ing it in place. The stock rear tail­lights were ditched for cus­tom ver­sions by Jamie Bridge­man. In the process of trans­form­ing the rear, the bed rails were made the same

thick­ness all the way around. Of course, it was all fin­ished off by shav­ing the usual items like the door han­dles and badges.

The fo­cal point of the in­te­rior is the cen­ter con­sole that starts from the smooth dash and runs to the back of the cab. The in­te­rior sheet metal was formed around a set of Tea’s De­sign bucket seats for a mod­ern look. The roof from a spare C-10 was used to cre­ate a smooth sheet metal head­liner. Cus­tom door pan­els were made along with a bil­let dash bezel cre­ated by John and Harold Laisure to house the Dakota Dig­i­tal gauges and Vin­tage Air lou­vers. The in­te­rior is sim­ple and mim­ics the look of the ex­te­rior.

At that point, Clint started show­ing the truck, which be­came one of the most mem­o­rable C-10s of the mid-2000s. But, its time in the lime­light was short be­cause peo­ple wanted to see the truck fin­ished. Un­for­tu­nately, Clint’s per­sonal and pro­fes­sional life pre­vented him from do­ing that.

For­tu­nately, Clint’s long­time friend and for­mer em­ployee at SIC Mo­tor­sports, Nick Ger­mano, was in­clined to see the truck through to com­ple­tion. He didn’t want the ’68 to sim­ply fade away, so he ex­changed some cash with Clint for the truck.

Nick is the owner of Outkast Kus­toms, a shop that con­sis­tently pumps out show-qual­ity rides. As the cliché goes, the shop owner’s ride is al­ways side­lined in fa­vor of pay­ing cus­tomers’, but af­ter seven years, Nick couldn’t wait any longer to fin­ish the C-10. The ma­jor push came when he and his then-fi­ancée, Ally, de­cided they wanted the truck fin­ished in time for their wed­ding. The truck

AT ITS DE­BUT, THE TRUCK BLEW PEO­PLE’S MINDS. THOUGH THE SCENE HAS EX­PANDED, THE OLDER PRO­JECT HAS COME OUT ON TOP AND SHOCKED NEW­BIES.”

made it to the wed­ding, but not un­der its own power. The new­ly­wed cou­ple mod­i­fied their dead­line to the up­com­ing SEMA Show.

Nick fin­ished things up with a few up­dates, like a mod­i­fied sus­pen­sion. Though the rear tri­an­gu­lated 4-link worked great, in­no­va­tions in front sus­pen­sions for these trucks ren­dered the older ver­sion on the path to ob­so­les­cence. He im­ple­mented Chop­pin’ Block’s IFS airbag sys­tem, and then a mod­ern Chevy LS3 with Hol­ley Ter­mi­na­tor wiring and con­troller was thrown into the mix. It was topped off with an alu­minum in­take man­i­fold and Scott’s Hotrods & Cus­toms valve cov­ers.

The truck re­ceived some body­work be­fore PPG Toner Red was sprayed. King Kus­tom Kovers re­did the up­hol­stery in leather and suede. The fi­nal touches were up­grad­ing the brakes to 16-inch ver­sions from Wil­wood and adding a set of 22-inch In­tro Raider bil­let wheels with Pirelli rub­ber.

At its de­but, the truck blew peo­ple’s minds. Though the scene has ex­panded, the older pro­ject has come out on top and shocked new­bies. Un­for­tu­nately, it was re­cently dam­aged and is cur­rently un­der re­pair. Along the way, Grant Kus­toms has al­ready made some ad­di­tions to it, and the truck will be back on the show cir­cuit soon.

ABOVE. THOUGH THERE HAVE BEEN MANY DIF­FER­ENT MO­TORS POW­ER­ING THIS TRUCK, NICK WENT WITH AN LS3 FOR THE CUR­RENT GO AROUND. THE CUS­TOM SHEET METAL COVER RIDS THE EN­GINE COM­PART­MENT OF DIS­TRACT­ING WIRES AND LINES.

RIGHT. THE 2002 SILVERADO COWL HOOD LINES FLOW TO THE CUS­TOM WIPER COWL ALL THE WAY INTO THE BED.

ONE OF THE SMALLER BODY MODS IN­CLUDES SQUARED REAR CAB COR­NERS.

THE THEME OF THE IN­TE­RIOR IS SIM­PLIC­ITY. THE CEN­TER CON­SOLE FLOWS FROM

THE DASH TO THE BACK WALL.

BE­LOW. THOSE 16-INCH WIL­WOOD BRAKES LOOK SICK AS THEY PEEK THROUGH THE SPOKES OF THE 22-INCH IN­TRO WHEELS.

BE­LOW. THE BED IS SU­PER SMOOTH, YET HAS ENOUGH ADDED LINES TO GIVE IT A TO­TALLY NEW STYLE.

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