THE BOT­TOM LINE

Street Trucks - - NEWS - BY KEVIN AGUILAR

IF YOU HAVE TALKED TO OTHER TRUCK OWN­ERS, YOU’VE PROB­A­BLY DIS­COV­ERED THAT SOME OF THEM CRE­ATE THEIR BUILDS BY FIN­ISH­ING SOME­ONE ELSE’S RIDE. A quick search of clas­si­fied ads on the in­ter­net will re­veal plenty of avail­able projects. Start­ing with some­one else’s older pro­ject is a com­mon way for peo­ple with ex­pe­ri­ence to get their hands a solid build foun­da­tion quickly.

It’s not a bad way to go, but it can be risky. If you know what to look for in a pro­ject, you might end up ahead of the game. How­ever, as a buyer, you need to be aware of what’s for sale. The first thing to look for is qual­ity hard parts. You can’t go wrong with good parts cor­rectly in­stalled; this is aside from parts like shocks, airbags and tires that could be bad from time or use. If parts have been welded, ex­am­ine the welds closely to make sure they are solid.

If all of these things check out, then you have your­self a good ve­hi­cle to build from. If there are some fix­able prob­lem ar­eas, don’t let them de­ter you from a truck; con­sider the pro­ject as a whole. Spend­ing lots of time to re­build what some­one did wrong can be coun­ter­pro­duc­tive, but if ev­ery­thing is gen­er­ally in good or­der, work on get­ting a fair price for your new pro­ject.

Although it might sound sad or mer­ce­nary to scoop up some­one else’s failed at­tempt, you might ac­tu­ally be do­ing them a fa­vor. Some­times peo­ple bite off more than they can chew, or they have the means to fin­ish a truck but cir­cum­stances change and plans have to be al­tered. Re­assess­ing pri­or­i­ties and sell­ing off toys might be some­one’s best so­lu­tion, mak­ing your pur­chase a mu­tu­ally ben­e­fi­cial ar­range­ment.

Though it might be tough for some­one to sur­ren­der their pride and joy, it’s also nice to see it go to a good home. By pick­ing up one of these projects, you can shine new light on some­thing that oth­er­wise would have faded away. No one wants to see their dream erode or go to the wrong per­son. That was the case with our cover truck. The orig­i­nal owner had an in­ter­est­ing plan for the truck. Not only was the ’68 C-10 wild, but it was com­pletely ahead of its time. See­ing a truck like this with heav­ily al­tered lines isn’t so un­usual to­day, but more than a decade ago, there was noth­ing like it.

The truck spent some time in the spot­light, but it was short-lived be­cause it was never fin­ished. Orig­i­nal owner Clint Pe­tree ex­pe­ri­enced a few ob­sta­cles that changed his build plans, but for­tu­nately, the truck landed in the right hands. As a good friend and for­mer em­ployee of Clint’s, Nick Ger­mano knew the truck well. Nick de­scribes his call to ac­tion as a way to “keep the truck in the fam­ily.”

It’s awe­some to see a truck like this saved from ir­rel­e­vance. In my time, I’ve seen nu­mer­ous wild projects get a lot of at­ten­tion, but never get com­pleted. I think what hap­pens is that the build plan is so un­usual that fin­ish­ing a wild pro­ject takes more ef­fort than many can spare. It’s hard to grasp what it will take to fin­ish these builds, be­cause there aren’t a lot of ex­am­ples to draw from.

Take these facts into con­sid­er­a­tion when you come up with an idea for your next great­est build. Though you might have a vi­sion, it’s im­por­tant to think about what it will re­ally take to see it through. With an abun­dance of aban­doned projects on the mar­ket, it might be more ben­e­fi­cial to save some­one else’s pro­ject than to start one from scratch. Re­mem­ber, the key to suc­cess is to do your re­search and keep an open mind.

HERE’S NICK GER­MANO’S TRUCK WHEN HE FIRST BOUGHT IT FROM HIS OLD FRIEND, CLINT PE­TREE. THOUGH IT LOOKS LIKE A FOR­GOT­TEN PRO­JECT, HE FI­NALLY FIN­ISHED IT, AND NOW IT ADORNS THIS MONTH’S COVER.

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