STRONG & SILENT

UM TAC­TI­CAL’S 9MM AR-STYLE SUB GUN… SO COOL AND SO VERY BADASS

Tactical World - - Contents - By Jeff Cotto

UM Tac­ti­cal’s 9mm Ar-style sub gun ... so cool and so very badass.

My first run in with UM Tac­ti­cal was dur­ing BAT De­fense’s Aerial Tar­get In­ter­dic­tion course. A mu­tual friend made the in­tro­duc­tion and wanted to show­case UM’S R.A.G.E. muz­zle brake. I got my hands on one, shot it and was sold!

SS9M

The R.A.G.E. (Rapid Ad­justable Gas Ex­pul­sion) is the world’s first re-con­fig­urable re­coil tun­ing and man­age­ment de­vice. This sys­tem al­lows you to di­vert the high pres­sure with in­ter­change­able an­gled ports, pro­vid­ing ex­cep­tional per­for­mance – which trans­lates to more rounds on tar­get.

It was a cou­ple months be­fore I saw UM again. I had re­cently wit­nessed UM’S SS9M sub gun on that same friend’s so­cial me­dia feed. See­ing this weapon sys­tem in ac­tion, I knew that I had to get one. For­tu­nately, less than a week later, I was con­tacted by Brian Wil­son from UM Tac­ti­cal to take a test run with the SS9M.

Once in my hands, a few things stood out. First, it’s a 9mm sub gun on an AR style plat­form that takes Glock 9mm mag­a­zines. It’s some­thing I have been very fa­mil­iar with for more than a decade of be­ing down­range around the world, both with the mil­i­tary and with clan­des­tine ser­vices. This plat­form looks and feels just like any other AR equipped with an am­bidex­trous bolt re­lease. My at­ten­tion was drawn to the MVB In­dus­tries’ ARC-X col­lapsi­ble stock. This five-po­si­tion col­lapsi­ble stock con­ve­niently re­quires only a one-handed op­er­a­tion to ex­tend.

The in­te­grally sup­pressed 6-inch bar­rel was scream­ing at me to pick this thing up and lay some “scu­nion” down. Set­ting a Shield RMS sight on top of the rails and throw­ing a set of rub­ber dum­mies with P3DT steel tar­gets down range, I fi­nally had my chance to get af­ter it.

UM Tac­ti­cal cur­rently makes two ver­sions of their SS9M sub gun. One comes with a lower that ac­cepts Glock mag­a­zines, and one is a more tra­di­tional Colt 9mm sub gun. Agen­cies that wish to uti­lize this sys­tem on their

“THE IN­TE­GRALLY SUP­PRESSED 6-INCH BAR­REL WAS SCREAM­ING AT ME TO PICK THIS THING UP…”

in­ven­to­ried Colts and ex­ist­ing mag­a­zines can eas­ily do so by chang­ing the orig­i­nal up­per with a new UM Tac­ti­cal in­te­grally sup­pressed up­per. Each of these ver­sions is available in a 10-inch bar­rel ver­sion and a 12-inch ver­sion. For test­ing, I ran the 12-inch model with Glock mags.

RANGE WORK

Set­ting up at the 25-yard line, out­fit­ted with 20 ETS Group 31 round mag­a­zines and a case of RUAG Am­motech GECO ammo (9mm 124gr), I fi­nally got to work. At 25 yards I found my­self con­sis­tently shoot­ing 1-inch groups. Once I was sat­is­fied with the group­ing on the semi-au­to­matic set­ting, I be­gan test­ing the full auto group­ing ca­pa­bil­i­ties. With a short three-round burst, I still found a tight group within 4 inches.

I then switched over to the rub­ber dum­mies and P3DT steel tar­gets to run some drills. The drills con­sisted of speed and ac­cu­racy drills, tar­get tran­si­tion­ing and mag changes. While run­ning these drills in full auto, I looked for muz­zle rise, and it was min­i­mal to non-ex­is­tent. Wit­ness­ing the tight groups ap­pear on the faces of the rub­ber dum­mies and hear­ing mul­ti­ple rounds strikes ring off the P3DT steel tar­gets was phe­nom­e­nal. “Rounds on tar­get:” That’s what I want to see and hear. That’s what lets me know that I’m com­ing home.

Next I threw some kit on and worked mag changes. Some mag­a­zines had 10 rounds, and some had 15 to 25 rounds. The point was to never know how many I would be get­ting so I could work those mag changes. I al­ways tell those I train that a mon­key can shoot a 30-round mag­a­zine (yes, there’s a YouTube video to prove it). It’s mag changes and im­me­di­ate ac­tion drills that truly save lives. The SS9M’S fa­mil­iar AR plat­form er­gonomics – par­tic­u­larly the po­si­tion mag and bolt re­leases – made reload­ing a fluid task.

We de­cided to stretch our legs a lit­tle and get some dis­tance out of this bad boy. We’d been shoot­ing at the 25-yard line all day, so we pushed it back to the 50-yard line. No is­sues there or at the 75-yard line. Back­ing up to the 100-yard line, we still got first-round hits stand­ing off hand. Well be­yond the en­gage­ment ranges of a typ­i­cal 9mm pis­tol, the SS9M is a re­li­able and ac­cu­rate sub gun when it comes to erad­i­cat­ing the threat.

RE­ACT TO CON­TACT

At the end of the day, we added a ve­hi­cle “re­act to con­tact” drill at 50 yards’ dis­tance to the berm. This drill con­sisted of two BAT De­fense in­struc­tors sit­ting in­side of a ’96 Jeep Chero­kee. One rub­ber dummy tar­get was placed in front of the ve­hi­cle and an­other dummy was placed down by the berm along with some P3DT steel tar­gets. Along the way we placed bar­ri­cades/bar­rels for us to ma­neu­ver to and shoot from. The drill started with a near threat right in front of us. Upon re­ceiv­ing the threat call, both driver and pas­sen­ger en­gaged and elim­i­nated the threat through the wind­shield.

The SS9M was placed along the right leg of the driver with a 31-round mag in­serted. There were no is­sues ma­nip­u­lat­ing this gun and get­ting af­ter it in­side the ve­hi­cle. We sim­u­lated a downed ve­hi­cle for this drill, so the driver bailed out and changed mags while the pas­sen­ger pro­vided cover fire. With the fa­mil­iar AR plat­form-style con­trols fa­cil­i­tat­ing a seam­less mag change, the driver quickly got back into the fight. Once at a bar­ri­cade, the driver gained fire su­pe­ri­or­ity, al­low­ing the pas­sen­ger to bail out and take cover. Bound­ing from one bar­ri­cade to an­other, we took turns con­duct­ing mag changes and elim­i­nat­ing the threats un­til we closed the dis­tance and ended the drill. Con­duct­ing this drill showed and proved that the SS9M can be taken into a gun­fight and be ma­nip­u­lated eas­ily in and around ve­hi­cles and bar­ri­cades all while main­tain­ing rounds on tar­get.

The abil­ity to get af­ter it with this full auto sub gun left me with the feeling that I would not have any is­sues to clos­ing in and de­stroy­ing my threats. From ex­pe­ri­ences and in my opin­ion, whether it be hos­tile en­vi­ron­ment en­coun­ters over­seas or do­mes­tic threats, I know shoul­der­ing the SS9M means I’ll be com­ing home.

FI­NAL THOUGHTS

My over­all im­pres­sion of the UM Tac­ti­cal’s SS9M is that it’s a pur­pose­fully de­signed and a well-built sub gun that’s made in the USA. The re­li­a­bil­ity was im­pec­ca­ble and the ac­cu­racy was out­stand­ing.

Now… I’ve trav­eled to Is­rael and shot Uzis with the Du­vde­van. I’ve shot MP5S with US el­e­ments. I def­i­nitely have love for those plat­forms, but I will tell you that there’s noth­ing like shoot­ing the in­te­grally sup­pressed SS9M. TW

“WITH A SHORT THREE­R­OUND BURST, I STILL FOUND A TIGHT GROUP WITHIN 4 INCHES.”

This com­pact pow­er­house shoul­ders eas­ily. It gets on tar­get fast and stays there.

The fa­mil­iar er­gonomics of the SS9M’S ARstyle plat­form means it takes zero time to get used to it.

THANKS FOR THE RIDE … Spe­cial thanks to Air­borne Tac­ti­cal Train­ing So­lu­tions and pi­lot Paul Barth for fly­ing us around in his MD500. One look at the ag­gres­sive pro­file of the SS9M and “thou shall not covet” gets thrown out the win­dow.

With an in­te­grally sup­pressed bar­rel, all you hear is the cy­cling of the ac­tion and the clink of empty brass hit­ting the deck.

The busi­ness end of fully sup­pressed bar­rel is the last thing any bad guy wants to see. The Shield RMS red dot is mated per­fectly to this PCC en­sur­ing, fast tar­get ac­qui­si­tion and tran­si­tion.

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