Time, dis­tance cause sep­a­ra­tion

The Arizona Republic - - Explore Az - Friend In Mary­land – Far­away Con­tact Dear Abby at www.Dear Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los An­ge­les, CA 90069. For an ex­cel­lent guide to be­com­ing a bet­ter con­ver­sa­tion­al­ist and a more so­cia­ble per­son, or­der “How to Be Pop­u­lar.” Send your name and mail­ing

Dear Abby: I’m a 15-year-old girl and a sopho­more in high school. Last year I went to school across the coun­try. While I was there, I be­came best friends with this girl, “Amelia.” We did ev­ery­thing to­gether, and Amelia even flew back here to visit my fam­ily when school ended and I had to go home.

It has now been a few months since I’ve seen her, and so much has changed. She doesn’t make time to text or call me hardly ever, and when she does, it’s al­ways a quick con­ver­sa­tion. Be­cause of the time dif­fer­ence and our sched­ules, I get that it’s dif­fi­cult, but shouldn’t she make some time for her best friend?

Amelia and I were as close as sis­ters, and I can’t stand the thought of los­ing her. I have al­ready called her out a few times, and we are good for a few days, but then she goes right back to pre­tend­ing like I don’t ex­ist. I’d rather not call her out again. Any thoughts? Dear Friend: Rather than “call her out,” it’s time to lighten up. Stop try­ing to make Amelia feel guilty for not giv­ing you the at­ten­tion she was able to when you were ge­o­graph­i­cally closer. If there’s one thing I have learned about friend­ships, it’s that they tend to ebb and flow.

Be­cause you now live apart, con­cen­trate on build­ing other re­la­tion­ships with peo­ple close by. This doesn’t mean you can’t re­main friendly with Amelia; it sim­ply means you are ex­pect­ing more from her than she’s able to give you. 22 24 25 26 29

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