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sin­gle lo­ca­tion, it’s as sim­ple and ef­fec­tive as the ghost or “dead babysit­ter” scare sto­ries kids tell each dur­ing sleep­overs. Bartlett 10. Crim­i­nal (R, 113 min.) The mem­o­ries of a dead CIA op­er­a­tive (Ryan Reynolds) are planted in a death-row in­mate (Kevin Cost­ner). Col­lierville Towne 16, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Daddy’s Home (PG-13, 96 min.) HH Doughy new step­dad Will Fer­rell com­petes with su­per­cool bi­o­log­i­cal fa­ther Mark Wahlberg for the af­fec­tions of two kids and sexy Linda Cardellini in this com­edy dis­ap­point­ment. Bartlett 10. Dead­pool (R, 108 min.) HHH This box-of­fice smash casts “Green Lan­tern” pen­i­tent Ryan Reynolds as the “X-men”-as­so­ci­ated an­ti­hero whose R-rated ver­bal and vi­o­lent ex­cesses help make this — for good and ill — the “Ted” of comic-book movies: Its snark­i­ness and no-risk “po­lit­i­cally in­cor­rect” at­ti­tude are essen­tially ado­les­cent, but it’s lively and funny. Bartlett 10, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. The Diver­gent Se­ries: Al­le­giant (PG-13, 121 min.) HH ½ The third (and penul­ti­mate) film in the youthskew­ing se­ries con­tains some won­der­ful sci­ence-fic­tion pro­duc­tion de­sign, but its in­creas­ingly ro­coco plot­ting and grow­ing char­ac­ter ros­ter di­lute the power of book author Veron­ica Roth’s premise, which in­tro­duced a dystopian so­ci­ety seg­re­gated by ap­ti­tude into “fac­tions.” This time, hero­ine Tris (Shai­lene Wood­ley), her boyfriend, Four (Theo James) and the other rebels cross fu­ture Chicago’s wall to es­cape into an apoc­a­lyp­tic waste­land and dis­cover the high-tech elit­ist com­mu­nity re­spon­si­ble for the fac­tion sys­tem. Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Eye in the Sky (R, 102 min.) He­len Mir­ren and Aaron Paul in a war-on-ter­ror sus­pense drama. Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. The 5th Wave (PG-13, 112 min.) Chloe Grace Moretz stars in yet another young adult sci-fi fran­chise starter. Bartlett 10. God’s Not Dead 2 ( PG, 121 min.) A high-school teacher’s “rea­soned re­sponse” to a ques­tion about Je­sus lands her in hot wa­ter. Cor­dova Cin­ema, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Gods of Egypt (PG-13, 100 min.) HH Camp flour­ishes (“I’m the god­dess of too much,” brags sexy Hathor), a few clever vis­ual fil­i­grees (molten gold runs from the wounds of in­jured deities) and an over­all aura of un­pre­ten­tious mytho (il) log­i­cal goofi­ness don’t quite com­pen­sate for the dig­i­tal te­dium of this odd sword-and-sor­cery would-be block­buster about the war be­tween one-eyed Horus (Niko­laj Coster-wal­dau) and brutish Set (Ger­ard But­ler), the son of Ra, the sun god (Ge­of­frey Rush). Bartlett 10. Green Room (R, 94 min.) HHH ½ The anti-ur­ban racial iso­la­tion­ism im­plicit to the in­bred ru­ral killer clans of “The Texas Chain Saw Mas­sacre” and its ilk is made ex­plicit in this tense, scary siege-hor­ror film about earnest punk rock­ers bat­tling for sur­vival after be­ing trapped in a back­woods club­house/com­pound op­er­ated by racist skin­heads and their white-su­prem­a­cist mas­ter­mind (Pa­trick Ste­wart, whose the­atri­cal au­thor­ity and ma­jor-stu­dio celebrity val­i­date this grungy ex­pe­ri­ence for movie­go­ers who shy away from ex­ploita­tion fare). If the vil­lains are neo-nazis, the style is neogrind­house: Like skilled wri­ter­di­rec­tor Jeremy Saulnier’s pre­vi­ous re­lease, “Blue Ruin,” the movie em­braces the do-ity­our­self re­source­ful­ness, sup­posed emo­tional hon­esty and pho­to­graphic re­al­ism of post-mum­blecore Amer­i­can in­de­pen­dent cin­ema with­out re­nounc­ing the ex­pres­sion­is­tic ex­tremes of vi­o­lence and ac­tion that mo­ti­vate and il­lu­mi­nate be­hav­ior in genre films. The de­tails are smart and sur­pris­ing, es­pe­cially in the pre­hor­ror mo­ments that de­pict the band mem­bers (An­ton Yelchin and Alia Shawkat among them) si­phon­ing gas, sleep­ing on the bor­rowed floors of in­sol­vent fans and oth­er­wise en­dur­ing sub­sis­tence-level life on the road. Par­adiso. A Holo­gram for the King (R, 97 min.) Tom Hanks is an Amer­i­can sales­man in Saudi Ara­bia in this adap­ta­tion of a novel by Dave Eg­gers. Kee­gan-michael Key (left) and Jor­dan Peele play friends who pose as drug deal­ers to re­trieve a kit­ten from a street gang in “Keanu.”

Ridge­way Cin­ema Grill. The Hunts­man: Win­ter’s War (PG-13, 114 min.) Chris Hemsworth is a heroic war­rior and Char­l­ize Theron an evil sor­cer­ess in this pre­quel to “Snow White and the Hunts­man.” Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Stage, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. The Jun­gle Book (PG, 105 min.) A live-ac­tion ver­sion of Rud­yard Ki­pling’s fa­mous story of a boy raised by wolves. Cine­planet 16 (in 3-D), Col­lierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cor­dova Cin­ema (in 3-D), De­soto Cin­ema 16 (in 3-D), For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema (in 3-D), Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema (in 3-D), Palace Cin­ema (in 3-D), Par­adiso (in 3-D), Stu­dio on the Squareo, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. Keanu (R, 98 min.) Tran­si­tion­ing from the TV screen to the big screen, the com­edy team of (Kee­ganMichael) Key and (Jor­dan) Peele play friends who pose as drug deal­ers to re­trieve a stolen kit­ten from a gang. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Palace Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Stage Cin­ema, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. Kung Fu Panda 3 (PG, 93 min.) Mo’ Po. Bartlett 10. Meet the Blacks (R, 93 min.) Mike Epps in a par­ody of “The Purge.” De­soto Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic. Miles Ahead (R, 100 min.) HH ½ Cin­ema, like jazz, ben­e­fits from artists who un­der­stand both

im­pro­vi­sa­tion and dis­ci­pline. Such an artist is Don Chea­dle, a tun­ing fork of an ac­tor who is the pro­ducer, di­rec­tor, co-screen­writer (with Steven Baigel­man) and star of this fan­ci­ful mis­ad­ven­ture, set in 1979, near the end of Miles Davis’ six-year re­treat from pub­lic mu­sic-mak­ing, when the jazz trum­pet ge­nius was a drug ad­dict and New York­based recluse. Chea­dle is a cap­ti­vat­ing Davis: He’s lean and hun­gry and ornery, with un­ruly Jheri-curled hair and a mys­ti­cal cool-cat aura. If we’re al­ways aware that we’re watch­ing an ac­tor in a phony sce­nario rather than scenes from a life, well, the movie has an an­swer for that: “I’m a Gem­ini, so I’m two peo­ple, any­way,” ex­plains Davis/ Chea­dle. This si­mul­tane­ity of­fers a jus­ti­fi­ca­tion for an un­tra­di­tional not-quite-biopic that of­fers a few flash­backs to the “Sketches of Spain” early 1960s but mostly fol­lows Davis and a pushy re­porter (Ewan Mc­gre­gor) as they score coke from a col­lege stu­dent, ex­change gun­shots with a body­guard and oth­er­wise move through a mix of his­tor­i­cal touch­stones and an­tic fan­tasy that sug­gests the in­flu­ence of the Coen brothers, whose films — “In­side Llewyn Davis,” “Hail, Cae­sar!” — sim­i­larly sug­gest that fic­tion and non­fic­tion are as per­me­able and con­nectable as the skins

of soap bub­bles. Ridge­way Cin­ema Grill. Mir­a­cles from Heaven (PG, 109 min.) Jen­nifer Gar­ner is a mother whose daugh­ter has a sup­pos­edly in­cur­able dis­ease in this faith-based drama. Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Mother’s Day (PG-13, 118 min.) A Garry Mar­shall joint, star­ring Ju­lia Roberts, Kate Hud­son and Jen­nifer Anis­ton. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Palace Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Ridge­way Cin­ema Grill, Stage Cin­ema, Stu­dio on the Square, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. My Big Fat Greek Wed­ding 2 (PG-13, 94 min.) Nia Varda­los and John Cor­bett are back after 14 years for “an even big­ger and Greeker wed­ding.” For­est Hill 8. Papa: Hem­ing­way in Cuba (R, 109 min.) In 1959 Ha­vana, a jour­nal­ist (Gio­vanni Ribisi) be­friends the ag­ing author (Adrian Sparks). Ridge­way Cin­ema Grill. Ratchet & Clank (PG, 94 min.) A fe­line-es­que alien be­friends an es­caped ro­bot in this com­puter-an­i­mated video-game adap­ta­tion. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cor­dova Cin­ema (in 3-D), De­soto Cin­ema 16 (in 3-D), For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema (in 3-D), Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema (in 3-D), Palace Cin­ema (in 3-D), Par­adiso (in 3-D), Stage Cin­ema (in 3-D). The Revenant (R, 156 min.) HHH ½ In this fron­tier epic of sur­vival and re­venge, Leonardo Dicaprio is real- life folk hero Hugh Glass; he’s mauled by a griz­zly and buried alive, but rises from his im­pro­vised grave to track his be­trayer (Tom Hardy) through a North Amer­i­can paradise. Bartlett 10. Ride Along 2 (PG-13, 102 min.) HH ½ This agree­able for­mula buddy/cop com­edy se­quel sends scowl­ing po­lice de­tec­tive Ice Cube and com­i­cal rookie of­fi­cer Kevin Hart from At­lanta to Mi­ami, a lo­ca­tion that jus­ti­fies mul­ti­ple bikini shots and the in­evitable use of the Mi­ami Sound Ma­chine’s “Conga” (the Fedex­fo­rum “Bongo Cam” theme song) dur­ing a slap­stick foot pur­suit. Sub­plots in­volve Hart’s im­pend­ing mar­riage to Cube’s sis­ter (Tika Sumpter) and Cube’s ten­ta­tive ro­man­tic in­ter­est in a no-non­sense Florida homi­cide de­tec­tive (Olivia Munn) with “man hands”; a mo­tif is Hart’s mas­tery of video games, which gives re­turn­ing di­rec­tor Tim Story an ex­cuse to con­vert por­tions of a lengthy car chase into HART-POV “Grand Theft Auto”-style com­puter an­i­ma­tion. Noth­ing great, but what can I say? — When the diminu­tive Hart, ar­gu­ing with a wed­ding plan­ner (Sherri Shep­herd), steps onto a ta­ble and gets knocked across the room by a ceil­ing fan, I laughed out loud. Bartlett 10. Risen (PG-13, 107 min.) Joseph Fi­ennes is a mil­i­tary tri­bune in an­cient Rome whose life is changed once he be­gins to in­ves­ti­gate a mys­te­ri­ous dis­ap­pear­ance of the cru­ci­fied crim­i­nal, Je­sus Christ. Bartlett 10. Zootopia (PG, 108 min.) HHH ½ Dis­ney’s lat­est dig­i­tally an­i­mated fea­ture is a con­traTrumpian, race-con­scious, po­lit­i­cal-con­spir­acy neo-noir in the guise of a talkingan­i­mal car­toon. For kids, it’s an un­der­dog story-meets­buddy com­edy, as young Judy Hopps (voiced by Mem­phis’ Gin­nifer Good­win) works her fluffy tail off to prove her worth as Zootopia’s first bunny cop while nav­i­gat­ing an un­easy al­liance with a sly petty-crim­i­nal fox (Ja­son Bate­man). It’s very funny and in­ge­niously de­signed. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Par­adiso, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8.

STEVE DI­ETL/WARNER BROS. EN­TER­TAIN­MENT VIA AP

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