MOVIES

The Commercial Appeal - Go Memphis - - MOVIES -

cousin, Mal­colm D. Lee — also is a re­sponse to the mur­der epi­demic plagu­ing in­ner-city Chicago, but it’s more hope­ful than mourn­ful. Bartlett 10. Bat­man v Su­per­man: Dawn of Jus­tice (PG-13, 151 min.) HHH This trou­bling su­per­hero epic con­jures a post-9/11 pre-apoc­a­lypse in which dreams, vi­sions, mem­o­ries, pop cul­ture, sci­ence fic­tion and his­tor­i­cal fact over­lap. The ef­fect is not so much the in­tro­duc­tion of a new DC Uni­verse as a night­mare of col­lid­ing mul­ti­verses. . Bartlett 10. The BFG (PG, 117 min.) HHH Work­ing from a 1982 chil­dren’s novel by the late Roald Dahl, di­rec­tor Steven Spiel­berg re­unites with “E.T.” screen­writer Melissa Mathi­son to re­visit the themes of their own 1982 suc­cess, but with a re­veal­ing re­ver­sal: This time, the film­mak­ers seem to iden­tify more with the wiz­ened fan­tas­ti­cal out­sider (a sad-faced Big Friendly Gi­ant, por­trayed through mo­tion­cap­ture an­i­ma­tion by Mark Ry­lance) than with the small child (an or­phan, played by Ruby Barn­hill) who be­comes the ti­tle char­ac­ter’s friend.

Cor­dova Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Cap­tain Amer­ica: Civil War (PG-13, 147 min.) HHH Like guest star Ant-man (Paul Rudd) in his new Gi­ant-man iden­tity, this some­what un­gainly Marvel se­quel al­most col­lapses un­der its own weight. Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Cen­tral In­tel­li­gence (PG-13, 114 min.) Star­ring Kevin Hart and Dwayne John­son. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Stage Cin­ema. The Con­jur­ing 2 (PG-13, 133 min.) HHH Re­turn­ing hus­ban­dand-wife ghost­busters Ed and Lor­raine War­ren (Pa­trick Wil­son and Vera Farmiga) are among the sources of evil-ex­or­cis­ing up­lift in this ef­fec­tive shocker from hor­ror im­pre­sario James Wan, again dip­ping into the War­ren “case files” of al­leged real-life haunt­ing. Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema. Find­ing Dory (PG, 103 min.) More finny fun from Pixar.

HCine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Stage Cin­ema. Free State of Jones (R, 139 min.) Matthew Mcconaughey in a his­tor­i­cal drama about the real-life Mis­sis­sippi farmer who led slaves and poor whites in a re­bel­lion against the Con­fed­er­acy. Par­adiso. Ghost­busters (PG-13, 116 min.) HHH This fe­male-cast re­make of the beloved 1984 hit is an over­due re­buke to the “fan­bro” id­ioc­racy but also a win­ning ex­am­ple of an “event” ac­tion-com­edy, with Kris­ten Wiig, an atyp­i­cally fam­ily-friendly Melissa Mccarthy, a flirty Kate Mckin­non (her hu­mor dada, her sex­u­al­ity coded) and Mem­phis-born Les­lie Jones as next-gen­er­a­tion pro­ton-pack­ers. The script’s evo­ca­tion of ter­ror­ism-anx­i­ety feels un­nec­es­sary (the vil­lain plants “ghost bombs” around the city, at­tract­ing the at­ten­tion of Home­land Se­cu­rity), and di­rec­tor Paul Feig (“Brides­maids”) al­lows the un­for­tu­nately in­evitable spe­cial-ef­fects cli­max to stretch into te­dium, but the movie works. The hu­mor is of­ten Marx Broth­ers-level ab­sur­dist (es­pe­cially when it in­volves Chris Hemsworth as the Ghost­busters’ hunky dimwit sec­re­tary); most of the call backs to the orig­i­nal film aren’t dis­rup­tive; and the lack of ro­man­tic sub­plots is es­pe­cially wel­come. Has any other big stu­dio movie pre­sented such an un­com­pro­mised cel­e­bra­tion of fe­male friend­ship? Cine­planet 16 (in 3-D), Col­lierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cor­dova Cin­ema (in 3-D), De­soto Cin­ema 16 (in 3-D), For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema (in 3-D), Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema (in 3-D), Palace Cin­ema, Par­adiso (in 3-D), Stage Cin­ema (in 3-D), Stu­dio on the Square, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. The Hunts­man: Win­ter’s War (PG-13, 114 min.) Chris Hemsworth is a heroic war­rior and Char­l­ize Theron an evil sor­cer­ess in this pre­quel to “Snow White and the Hunts­man.” Bartlett 10. In­de­pen­dence Day: Resur­gence (PG-13, 119 min.) ½ Dopey but watch­able, the ac­ci­den­tally prophetic first “In­de­pen­dence Day” of­fered sneak at­tack from the sky and the strate­gic smash­ing of land­marks (the White House, blasted to smithereens,

five years be­fore the Twin Tow­ers). Twenty years later, the movie’s apoc­a­lyp­tic para­noia is com­mon­place while its oneworld-united op­ti­mism seems quaint and naive. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. The In­fil­tra­tor (R, 127 min.) Un­der­cover de­tec­tive Bryan Cranston in­fil­trates the Es­co­bar drug em­pire. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Palace Cin­ema, Ridge­way Cin­ema Grill. The Jun­gle Book (PG, 105 min.) HHH ½ Du­bi­ously de­scribed by most re­view­ers as a “live­ac­tion” adap­ta­tion of Rud­yard Ki­pling’s late-vic­to­rian story, this ex­tremely en­ter­tain­ing and some­times moving Dis­ney episodic ad­ven­ture fea­tures re­mark­ably re­al­is­tic an­i­mals, trop­i­cal fo­liage and ex­otic Asian land­scapes. Bartlett 10. The Leg­end of Tarzan (PG13, 109 min.) HHH Di­rected by “Harry Pot­ter” vet­eran David Yates and scripted by Adam Cozad and Mem­phis’ Craig Brewer, the first ma­jor live-ac­tion Tarzan movie in three decades re­habs the prob­lem­atic and eludes the in­de­fen­si­ble as­pects of Edgar Rice Bur­roughs’ story. Set in the 1880s, this “Leg­end” in­tro­duces the cloth­ing-con­stricted John Clay­ton, Lord Greystoke (an ap­pro­pri­ately lithe and sculpted Alexander Skars­gaard) at a meet­ing at Num­ber 10 Down­ing St., where the for­mer Tarzan — eight years out of Africa — sips tea while lis­ten­ing to con­de­scend­ing gov­ern­ment re­ports on “the poor na­tives” of the Bel­gian Congo. Be­fore long, Greystoke and his wife, Jane (Mar­got Rob­bie), are on a mis­sion that takes them back to Africa, where they shed their in­hi­bi­tions (and clothes) while join­ing real-life re­former George Wash­ing­ton Williams (Sa­muel L. Jack­son) and var­i­ous tribes­peo­ple in a bat­tle against slave traders and the mer­ci­less Leon Rom (Christoph Waltz). Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Palace Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Stage Cin­ema, Stu­dio on the Square, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. Love & Friend­ship (PG, 92 min.) HHHH An ab­so­lute gem from start to fin­ish, Whit Still­man’s adap­ta­tion of Jane Austen’s posthu­mously pub­lished novella “Lazy Su­san” is a sharp so­cial satire. Kate Beck­in­sale is Lazy Su­san, an at­trac­tive and wily wi­dow who nav­i­gates among the es­tates of 1790s Eng­land in pur­suit of se­cu­rity (a hus­band) for her­self and her daugh­ter (Morfydd Clark); Chloë Se­vi­gny (as an Amer­i­can ex­pat), Xavier Sa­muel (as a smit­ten young heir) and a scene-steal­ing Tom Ben­nett (as an ami­able “block­head”) are among the al­lies, suit­ors, ri­vals and on­look­ers in the es­timable sup­port­ing ensem­ble. Ridge­way Cin­ema Grill. Me Be­fore You (PG-13, 110 min.) Call this ro­mance “Hunger Games of Thrones”: It stars Emilia Clarke and Sam Claflin. Bartlett 10. Mike and Dave Need Wed­ding Dates (R, 98 min.) A com­edy in which the girls (Anna Ken­drick, Aubrey Plaza) are as raunchy as the guys (Zac Efron, Adame Devine). Col­lierville Towne 16, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Palace Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Mir­a­cles from Heaven (PG, 109 min.) Jen­nifer Gar­ner is a mother whose daugh­ter has a sup­pos­edly in­cur­able dis­ease in this faith-based drama. Bartlett 10. Neigh­bors 2: Soror­ity Ris­ing (R, 92 min.) Chubby dad Seth Ro­gen en­lists cut frat neme­sis Zac Efron to com­bat a par­ty­hearty soror­ity. Bartlett 10. Now You See Me 2 (PG-13, 129 min.) HH The celebrity il­lu­sion­ists, card sharps, mes­merists and pres­tidig­i­ta­tors known as “The Four Horse­men” this time are re­cruited by a venge­ful tech prodigy (Daniel Rad­cliffe) to pil­fer the pri­va­cy­eras­ing soft­ware of a cor­rupt cap­i­tal­ist. Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Our Kind of Traitor (R, 108 min.) Ewan Mcgre­gor and Stel­lan Skars­gard star in di­rec­tor Su­sanna White’s spy thriller, adapted from a novel by John le Carré. Ridge­way Cin­ema Grill. The Purge: Elec­tion Year (R, 105 min.) HH ½ With the tag line “Keep Amer­ica Great”, the third “Purge” film is more a grind­house “Hunger Games” chap­ter than the sharp-fo­cused ter­ror ex­er­cise of the 2013 orig­i­nal, as re­turn­ing wri­ter­di­rec­tor James De­monaco pur­sues ca­ble tele­vi­sion-style long­form sto­ry­telling and overt so­ciopo­lit­i­cal mes­sag­ing over the an­thol­ogy hor­ror for­mat that would have been an ideal fit for the se­ries’ in­ge­nious foun­da­tional con­ceit (in the near-fu­ture U.S., all crime is le­gal for 12 hours on the day of “The Purge,” a new civic tra­di­tion that al­lows cit­i­zens to let off steam, how­ever lethal). Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Palace Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Stage Cin­ema, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. The Se­cret Life of Pets (PG, 90 min.) An an­i­mated cats-and­dogs-and-more com­edy from Il­lu­mi­na­tion En­ter­tain­ment (the “Min­ions” stu­dio). Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Palace Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Stage Cin­ema, Stu­dio on the Square, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. The Shal­lows (PG-13, 87 min.) HHH Un­pre­ten­tious and ef­fi­cient, this taut “B” film — the B is for beach, bikini, Blake Lively, bites and blood — makes the best of its lim­ited re­sources and ge­og­ra­phy, milk­ing sus­pense from the sim­ple premise of a lone Amer­i­can surfer (Lively) trapped on a small rock in an iso­lated Mex­i­can cove by a great white shark. Us­ing im­ages and texts from the tourist’s cell phone as a trig­ger, writer An­thony Jaswin­ski and di­rec­tor Jaume Col­let-sera evoke enough sym­pa­thetic back story to make the surfer more than a ci­pher, but they never al­low such rev­e­la­tions of “mo­ti­va­tion” to take prece­dence over the ac­tion-de­pic­tion of the surfer’s re­source­ful­ness (Lively is ex­cel­lent, in what is al­most a solo per­for­mance). Props to cin­e­matog­ra­pher Flavio Martinez Labi­ano, who trans­forms the wa­ter and lush for­est into a par­tic­u­larly tac­tile form of eye candy. Cor­dova Cin­ema, De­soto Cin­ema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cin­ema, Par­adiso, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cin­ema 8. Sul­tan (Not rated, 170 min.) A Hindi ac­tion-ro­mance about a mixed mar­tial artist. Hol­ly­wood 20 Cin­ema. Zootopia (PG, 108 min.) HHH ½ Dis­ney’s lat­est dig­i­tally an­i­mated fea­ture is a race­con­scious, po­lit­i­cal-con­spir­acy neo-noir in the guise of a talk­ing-an­i­mal car­toon. For kids, it’s an al­ter­nately cud­dly and ex­u­ber­ant un­der­dog sto­rymeets-buddy com­edy, as ea­ger young Judy Hopps (voiced by Mem­phis’ Gin­nifer Good­win) works her fluffy tail off to prove her worth as Zootopia’s first bunny cop. Bartlett 10.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.