MOVIES

The Commercial Appeal - Go Memphis - - GO EAT -

ad­ven­ture screens (in 2D) each week­end in July. 4 p.m. Sat­ur­day and Sun­day, CTI 3D Gi­ant The­ater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adult (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Lin­coln Cen­ter at the Movies: Great Amer­i­can Dance — Bal­let His­pan­ico: Car­men. maquia/club Ha­vana (Not rated, 105 min.) A per­for­mance in­cor­po­rat­ing rumba, conga, cha-cha and other Latin rhythms, filmed live in New York. 7 p.m. Tues­day, Par­adiso. Tick­ets: $19. Visit malco.com. Liv­ing in the Age of Air­planes 2D (Not rated, 45 min.) Ex­pe­ri­ence age flight and its im­pact upon com­merce and cul­ture. Through Aug. 6, CTI 3D Gi­ant The­ater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adult (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Max (PG, 111 min.) The out­door “Movie Night at Car­riage Cross­ing” se­ries con­tin­ues with a live-ac­tion fam­ily drama about the trou­bles fac­ing a dog who served with the Marines in Afghanistan as he tries to read­just to “civil­ian” life in the U.S. “Pre-movie fun” be­gins at 7 p.m., and the film start at dusk. Fam­i­lies are en­cour­aged to bring blan­kets and lawn chairs. Fri­day, Cen­tral Park at Car­riage Cross­ing, 4674 Mer­chants Park Cir­cle, Col­lierville. Ad­mis­sion: free. Visit shop­car­riage­cross­ing.com. Mem­phis Heat: The True Story of Mem­phis Wrasslin’ (Not rated, 91 min.) An out­door screen­ing of the wrestling doc­u­men­tary, pre­ceded by Bea­tles-in-mem­phis footage and more. See story on Page ??. 8 p.m. Sat­ur­day, old Fair­grounds greensward. Ad­mis­sion: free. Visit col­i­se­um­coal­tion.org. Na­tional Parks Ad­ven­ture 3D (Not rated, 45 min.) Robert Red­ford nar­rates this ul­ti­mate off-trail ad­ven­ture into the na­tion’s great out­doors and un­tamed wilder­ness. Through Aug. 6, CTI 3D Gi­ant The­ater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adult (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions Ab­so­lutely Fab­u­lous: The Movie (R, 90 min.) A bigscreen revival of the BBC sit­com. Ridge­way Cinema Grill. Al­ice Through the Look­ing Glass (PG, 113 min.) A re­turn to Won­der­land. Bartlett 10. Bar­ber­shop: The Next Cut (PG-13, 112 min.) HHH An un­of­fi­cial com­pan­ion piece to Spike Lee’s “ChiRaq,” this fourth film in the “Bar­ber­shop” se­ries — di­rected by Spike’s cousin, Mal­colm D. Lee — also is a re­sponse to the mur­der epi­demic plagu­ing in­nercity Chicago, but it’s more hope­ful than mourn­ful. Bartlett 10. Bat­man v Su­per­man: Dawn of Jus­tice (PG-13, 151 min.) HHH This trou­bling su­per­hero epic con­jures a post-9/11 pre-apoca­lypse in which dreams, vi­sions, mem­o­ries, pop cul­ture, science fic­tion and his­tor­i­cal fact over­lap. The ef­fect is not so much the in­tro­duc­tion of a new DC Uni­verse as a night­mare of col­lid­ing mul­ti­verses. Bartlett 10. The BFG (PG, 117 min.) HHH Work­ing from a 1982 chil­dren’s novel by the late Roald Dahl, di­rec­tor Steven Spiel­berg re­unites with “E.T.” screen­writer Melissa Mathi­son to re­visit the themes of their own 1982 suc­cess, but with a re­veal­ing re­ver­sal: This time, the film­mak­ers seem to iden­tify more with the wiz­ened fan­tas­ti­cal out­sider (a sad-faced Big Friendly Gi­ant, por­trayed through mo­tion-cap­ture an­i­ma­tion by Mark Ry­lance) than with the small child (an or­phan, played by Ruby Barn­hill) who be­comes the ini­tial-id’ed ti­tle char­ac­ter’s friend and sav­ior. Like Spiel­berg, the ag­ing BFG is a vet­eran har­vester and sower of dreams (lit­er­ally, in the gi­ant’s case), whose play­ful im­pulses are at odds with the mean­spir­ited ag­gres­sion of his more gar­gan­tuan con­tem­po­raries (the other gi­ants — the vi­o­lent roll call in­cludes “Giz­zardgulper” and “Child­chewer” -- are can­ni­bals who hunt hu­man “beans”); un­like Spiel­berg, Dahl fa­vored the weird over the re­as­sur­ing, and the source ma­te­rial’s strange­ness prob­a­bly ex­plains the movie’s rel­a­tive box-of­fice fail­ure (just as it will as­sure its fu­ture cult sta­tus). Although it is a scrupu­lously de­signed mar­vel of stu­dio tech, the film is at its most cin­e­matic when the gi­ant prowls noc­tur­nal Lon­don, hid­ing in plain sight in shots that rely more on op­ti­cal il­lu­sion than on spe­cial ef­fects soft­ware; less sub­tle is the ex­plo­sive comic flat­u­lence (lifted from the book) caused by the gi­ant’s “frob­scot­tle,” a drink with bub­bles that flow down­ward, as if to call our at­ten­tion to the many other “E.T.” re­ver­sals (the “mon­ster” hides the child, rather than vice versa; the au­thor­i­ties wel­come rather than pur­sue the mon­ster; and so on). Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. Cen­tral In­tel­li­gence (PG13, 114 min.) Star­ring Kevin Hart and Dwayne John­son. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Olive Branch Cinema, Par­adiso, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. The Con­jur­ing 2 (PG-13, 133 min.) HHH Re­turn­ing hus­band-and-wife ghost­busters Ed and Lor­raine War­ren (Pa­trick Wil­son and Vera Farmiga) are among the sources of

HOPPER STONE/COLUMBIA PIC­TURES, SONY VIA AP

Les­lie Jones (from left), Melissa Mccarthy, Kris­ten Wiig and Kate Mck­in­non in Paul Feig’s re­boot of “Ghost­busters.”

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