MOVIES

The Commercial Appeal - Go Memphis - - MOVIES -

The 9th Life of Louis Drax (R, 108 min.) Alexan­dre Aja (“High Ten­sion”) di­rects this adap­ta­tion of Liz Jensen’s best-seller about a boy (Ai­den Long­worth) with a sixth sense. Cor­dova Cinema. No Manches Frida (PG-13, 114 min.) A Span­ish-lan­guage com­edy about a ditzy bank rob­ber who poses as a sub­sti­tute teacher to ac­cess the loot buried be­neath Frida Kahlo High. Par­adiso. Tho­dari (Not rated, 150 min.) A Tamil-lan­guage ro­man­tic thriller. Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. Yoga Hosers (PG-13, 88 min.) Kevin Smith di­rects his daugh­ter, Har­ley Quinn Smith (re­ally), and Johnny Depp’s daugh­ter, Lily-rose Depp, in his orig­i­nal screen­play about teenage yoga en­thu­si­asts who bat­tle the su­per­nat­u­ral en­tity that is threat­en­ing their party plans. Johnny Depp reprises the role of French Cana­dian man-hunter Guy La­pointe, in­tro­duced in Smith’s pre­vi­ous film, “Tusk.” Cine­planet 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema. Coun­try Blues Fes­ti­val (Not rated, 70 min.) This 1969 made-for-tele­vi­sion “Sounds of Sum­mer” episode fo­cused on Mem­phis’ bar­rier-break­ing Coun­try Blues Fes­ti­val, which brought to­gether such artists — black and white — as Jim Dick­in­son, the Bar-kays and Bukka White. A panel dis­cus­sion fol­lows the movie. 7 p.m. Thurs­day, Le­vitt Shell. Ad­mis­sion: free. Visit in­diemem­phis.com. Im­i­ta­tion of Life (Not rated, 125 min.) The WLOK-AM 1340/ Brooks Mu­seum “Black Film Fes­ti­val” con­cludes with a 1959 mas­ter­piece. See story on Page 15. 3 p.m. Sun­day, Mem­phis Brooks Mu­seum of Art. Ad­mis­sion: free. Visit brooksmu­seum. com. Jean-michel Cousteau’s Se­cret Ocean 3D (Not rated, 45 min.) Through Nov. 18, CTI 3D Giant Theater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adult (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Shown in reg­u­lar non-3d for­mat Mon­days through Fri­days at 4 p.m. only. Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Jour­ney to Space 3D (Not rated, 45 min.) Ex­pe­ri­ence space flight his­tory and the space shut­tle pro­gram. Through Nov. 18, CTI 3D Giant Theater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adults (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Life (R, 108 min.) The WLOK Ra­dio/brooks Mu­seum “Black Film Fes­ti­val” con­tin­ues with a 1999 com­edy star­ring Ed­die Mur­phy and Martin Lawrence as long­time prison-farm in­mates. 11 a.m. Satur­day, Mem­phis Brooks Mu­seum of Art. Ad­mis­sion: free. Visit brooksmu­seum. com. Liv­ing in the Age of Air­planes 2D (Not rated, 45 min.) Ex­pe­ri­ence flight and its im­pact upon com­merce and cul­ture. Through Sept. 11, CTI 3D Giant Theater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adult (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Na­tional Parks Ad­ven­ture 3D (Not rated, 45 min.) Robert Red­ford nar­rates this off-trail trek through the un­tamed wilder­ness of more than 30 na­tional parks. Through Nov. 18, CTI 3D Giant Theater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adult (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. The Nev­erend­ing Story (PG, 102 min.) 2 p.m. Sun­day and 7 p.m. Wed­nes­day, Par­adiso. Tick­ets: $13.50. Visit malco.com. Out­flix Film Fes­ti­val: See story on Page 12. Wed­nes­day through Sept. 11, Ridge­way Cinema Grill. Tick­ets: $10 per screen­ing ($8 for stu­dents), or $100 for a fes­ti­val pass ($75 for stu­dents). Visit out­flixfes­ti­val.org. School Daze (R, 121 min.) The WLOK Ra­dio/brooks Mu­seum “Black Film Fes­ti­val” be­gins with this 1988 com­edy-drama about a black fra­ter­nity at a his­tor­i­cally black col­lege. 3 p.m. Fri­day, Mem­phis Brooks Mu­seum of Art. Ad­mis­sion: free. Visit brooksmu­seum. com. Star Wars: The Force Awak­ens (PG-13, 136 min.) The lat­est “Star Wars” se­quel be­gins a sec­ond month of week­end screen­ings on the giant-size Pink Palace screen. In 2D. 4 p.m. Satur­day, Sun­day and Mon­day, CTI 3D Giant Theater, Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral Ave. Tick­ets: $9 adult (13-59), $8 se­niors (60+), $7 chil­dren (3-12). Call 901-636-2362 for show­times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. The Tested (Not rated, 106 min.) A po­lice of­fi­cer shoots and kills an un­armed teenager in this drama about race re­la­tions and the con­se­quences of tragedy. 4p.m.satur­day,1and7p.m.sun­day,baobab Film­house, 652 Mar­shall. Tick­ets: $12.50 at the door ($10 for mati­nees), $10 in ad­vance ($8 for mati­nees), $8 for se­niors and stu­dents. Visit baob­a­b­film­house.com. 2 Days in New York ( R, 96 min.) A 2012 com­edy about the may­hem that en­sues when fam­ily mem­bers de­scend on the Man­hat­tan apart­ment of a mixed-race cou­ple, played by Julie Delpy (who also di­rected) and Chris Rock. 7 p.m. Fri­day, 1 and 7 p.m. Satur­day, 4 p.m. Sun­day, Baobab Film­house, 652 Mar­shall. Tick­ets: $12.50 at the door ($10 for mati­nees), $10 in ad­vance ($8 for mati­nees), $8 for se­niors and stu­dents. Visit baob­a­b­film­house.com. Wattstax (R, 103 min.) The WLOK Ra­dio/brooks Mu­seum “Black Film Fes­ti­val” con­tin­ues with this clas­sic 1973 con­cert film, which show­cases such Stax artists as Ru­fus Thomas, Isaac Hayes and the Sta­ple Singers dur­ing an all-day event at Los An­ge­les Memo­rial Coli­seum. 7 p.m. Fri­day, Mem­phis Brooks Mu­seum of Art. Ad­mis­sion: free. Visit brooksmu­seum. com. Bad Moms ( R, 101 min.) Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Olive Branch Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. Ben-hur (PG-13, 124 min.) Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema. The BFG ( PG, 117 min.) HHH Bartlett 10. Café So­ci­ety (PG-13, 96 min.) HHH For­est Hill 8. Cap­tain Amer­ica: Civil War (PG-13, 147 min.) HHH Bartlett 10. Cen­tral In­tel­li­gence (PG-13, 114 min.) Star­ring Kevin Hart and Dwayne John­son. Bartlett 10. Don’t Breathe (R, 88 min.) HHH ½ Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cinema, Palace

Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. Equity (R, 100 min.) Fe­male cre­ators tackle a story about in­vest­ment bank­ing cor­rup­tion. Ridge­way Cinema Grill. Find­ing Dory (PG, 103 min.) Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. Florence Foster Jenk­ins (PG13, 110 min.) Meryl Streep in a biopic about a New York heiress with a ter­ri­ble voice who is de­ter­mined to be an opera singer. Ridge­way Cinema Grill. Ghost­busters (PG-13, 116 min.) HHH De­soto Cinema 16, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. Greater (PG, 131 min.) Christo­pher Sev­e­rio is Arkansas Ra­zor­back Bran­don Burlsworth, de­scribed as “pos­si­bly the great­est walk-on in the his­tory of col­lege foot­ball.” Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, Par­adiso. Hands of Stone (R, 105 min.) Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cinema, Palace Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema. Hell or High Wa­ter (R, 102 min.) Jeff Bridges, Chris Pine and Ben Foster in a

Hcon­tem­po­rary Western about Texas bank rob­bers. Cor­dova Cinema, Ridge­way Cinema Grill. Hil­lary’s Amer­ica: The Se­cret His­tory of the Demo­cratic Party (PG-13, 107 min.) Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. Ice Age: Col­li­sion Course (PG, 94 min.) Cine­planet 16, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. In­de­pen­dence Day: Resur­gence (PG-13, 119 min.) ½ Dopey but watch­able. Cine­planet 16. Ja­son Bourne (PG-13, 121 min.) Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Olive Branch Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. The Jun­gle Book (PG, 105 min.) HHH ½ Bartlett 10. Kubo and the Two Strings (PG, 101 min.) Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cinema, Palace Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema. The Le­gend of Tarzan (PG-13, 109 min.) HHH Bartlett 10. Lights Out (PG-13, 81 min.) HH ½Direc­tor David F. Sand­berg’s fairly ef­fec­tive fea­ture de­but imag­ines an an­gry ghost with a long­time in­flu­ence on a frac­tured fam­ily that in­cludes a self-med­i­cat­ing mess of a mother (Maria Bello), a sweet-na­tured young son (Gabriel Bate­man) and a re­la­tion­ship-wary daugh­ter (Teresa Palmer, whose Goth at­tire and glower can’t hide her Cal­i­for­nia-by-way-of-aus­tralia surfer-girl glow). Bartlett 10, Cine­planet 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Ma­jes­tic, Palace Cinema, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in, Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. Me­chanic: Res­ur­rec­tion (R, 99 min.) Ja­son Statham re­turns as uber-as­sas­sin Arthur Bishop. Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cinema, Palace Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. Nerve (PG-13, 96 min.) Emma Roberts and Dave Franco par­tic­i­pate in a mo­bile on­line game even more dan­ger­ous than “Poke­mon Go.” Cine­planet 16, Olive Branch Cinema. Nine Lives (PG, 87 min.) Self­cen­tered busi­ness exec Kevin Spacey learns to be a bet­ter fa­ther when he mag­i­cally is trans­ported into the body of the fam­ily cat. Wolfchase Gal­le­ria Cinema 8. Now You See Me 2 (PG-13, 129 min.) HH More larce­nous leg­erde­main with the celebrity il­lu­sion­ists, card­sharps, mes­merists and pres­tidig­i­ta­tors known as “The Four Horse­men,” who this time are re­cruited by a venge­ful tech prodigy (Daniel Rad­cliffe) to pil­fer the pri­va­cy­eras­ing soft­ware of a cor­rupt cap­i­tal­ist (Ben Lamb, a real-life poker pro­fes­sional). Bartlett 10. Pete’s Dragon (PG, 82 min.) HHH ½ “Be open to look­ing” is both meta­phys­i­cal coun­sel and prac­ti­cal ad­vice in direc­tor David Low­ery’s pow­er­ful film about a lit­er­ally warm and fuzzy fire-breather with a prog­nathic jaw (a 1960s-70s Dis­ney atavism: see also Bagheera, Tig­ger, O’mal­ley the al­ley cat and the orig­i­nal “Pete’s Dragon”), func­tional wings and a power — in­vis­i­bil­ity — that lit­er­al­izes the story’s mes­sage that “just be­cause you don’t see some­thing doesn’t mean it’s not there.” Oakes Be­g­ley stars as a wild or­phan boy liv­ing in the for­est with the help of El­liott, the friendly dragon (the premise links the boy to two of this year’s other movie he­roes, Mowgli and Tarzan); Bryce Dal­las Howard and Robert Red­ford are the sym­pa­thetic park ranger and old-timer, re­spec­tively, who be­come not just dis­cov­er­ers but pro­tec­tors of Pete and El­liott af­ter lum­ber­jack Karl Ur­ban and his crew re­al­ize a mon­ster might be more prof­itable than tim­ber. A re­make of a 1977 Dis­ney film that com­bined live ac­tion with tra­di­tional an­i­ma­tion (re­placed here by re­al­is­tic if styl­ized dig­i­tal an­i­ma­tion), the movie marks an en­tirely suc­cess­ful tran­si­tion to the big (stu­dio) leagues for direc­tor/co-writer David Low­ery, a mul­ti­task­ing stal­wart of mi­cro-bud­get cinema who has worked as an ed­i­tor, cin­e­matog­ra­pher and sound recordist on such no­table films as “Up­stream Color,” “Sun Don’t Shine” and Ken­tucker Aud­ley’s made-in­Mem­phis “Open Five.” Indie Mem­phis Film Fes­ti­val reg­u­lars may rec­og­nize the con­nec­tion be­tween this “Dragon” and Low­ery’s 2009 fea­ture “St. Nick,” a much smaller-scale story about chil­dren sur­viv­ing on their own in a woodsy en­vi­ron­ment; both movies dra­ma­tize the so-called magic and in­no­cence of child­hood with imag­i­na­tion and with­out con­de­scen­sion. Cine­planet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Olive Branch Cinema, Palace Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema. The Purge: Elec­tion Year (R, 105 min.) HH ½ With the tag line “Keep Amer­ica Great”) in­spired by the sea­son’s scari­est se­rial (the Trump cam­paign), the third “Purge” film is more a grind­house “Hunger Games” chap­ter than the sharp-fo­cused ter­ror ex­er­cise of the 2013 orig­i­nal, as re­turn­ing wri­ter­di­rec­tor James De­monaco pur­sues ca­ble tele­vi­sion-style long­form sto­ry­telling and overt so­ciopo­lit­i­cal mes­sag­ing over the an­thol­ogy hor­ror for­mat that would have been an ideal fit for the se­ries’ in­ge­nious foun­da­tional con­ceit (in the near-fu­ture U.S., all crime is le­gal for 12 hours on the day of “The Purge,” a new civic tra­di­tion that al­lows cit­i­zens to let off steam, how­ever lethal). An un­for­tu­nate side ef­fect of De­monaco’s de­sire to be taken se­ri­ously is an in­creased em­pha­sis on Es­tab­lish­ment rather than street-level char­ac­ters, as the re­turn­ing he­roes of the fine sec­ond film, “The Purge: Anar­chy,” de­vote them­selves to pro­tect­ing a pro­gres­sive sen­a­tor (El­iz­a­beth Mitchell) who is run­ning for pres­i­dent on an anti-purge plat­form. Still, as a splat­ter paint­ing of provo­ca­tions (psy­cho killers dressed as Un­cle Sam and the Statue of Lib­erty) and po­lar­iza­tion (evo­ca­tions of the tea party, Black Lives Mat­ter, the “1 per­cent,” the NRA and so on), the movie de­liv­ers its own sick kick. Bartlett 10. Re­mem­ber the Goal (PG) A Chris­tian drama about a cross­coun­try coach at a girls school. Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema. Sausage Party (R, 83 min.) HHH Ex­is­ten­tial howl of de­spair meets stoner belly laugh in the lat­est project from writ­ing/ pro­duc­ing part­ners Seth Ro­gen, Evan Gold­berg, Kyle Hunter and Ariel Shaf­fer, who fol­low the apoc­a­lypse an­tics of “This Is the End” with an­other clever if of­ten ju­ve­nile high-con­cept com­edy that, like a hor­ror movie, re­duces its char­ac­ters to meat. That’s lit­er­ally so in the case of this very un-pixar, very R-rated dig­i­tally an­i­mated “party,” in which a sausage (voiced by Ro­gen) who yearns to be united with a comely bun (Kris­ten Wiig) dis­cov­ers that the “Great Beyond” wait­ing out­side the gro­cery store is not the par­adise promised by food­stuff the­ol­ogy but a dead end, where he and his friends (a Sap­phic taco voiced by Salma Hayek, a mis­shapen hot dog voiced by Michael Cera) will be peeled, chopped, sautéed and de­voured. The eth­nic as­so­ci­a­tions of the prod­ucts pro­vide an ex­cuse for lots of racial pro­fil­ing (“They call me Mr. Grits”) and re­li­gious provo­ca­tion (the Woody Al­lenesque “Sammy Bagel Jr.” main­tains a run­ning de­bate about dis­puted shelf ter­ri­tory with an Ara­bic flat­bread), while the vis­ual, ver­bal and con­cep­tual puns fly freely (voiced by Nick Kroll, the cen­tral vil­lain is a douche who’s a real douche). The cli­mac­tic pol­y­sex­ual food orgy would be X-rated if the par­tic­i­pants weren’t the likes of dough­nuts and car­rots, but the ver­biage is some­times just as shame­less as the ac­tion: “Friends, ra­men, Coun­try Club crack­ers, lend me your ears — of corn,” in­tones the sausage. The di­rec­tors are an­i­ma­tion veter­ans Con­rad Ver­non (“Mon­sters vs. Aliens”) and Greg Tier­nan (the prophet­i­cally sub­ti­tled “Thomas & Friends: Sticky Sit­u­a­tions”). Col­lierville Towne 16, Cor­dova Cinema, De­soto Cinema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Ma­jes­tic, Olive Branch Cinema, Palace Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema, Stu­dio on the Square, Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-in. The Se­cret Life of Pets (PG, 90 min.) An an­i­mated cats-and­dogs-and-more com­edy from Il­lu­mi­na­tion En­ter­tain­ment (the

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