Ari­zona is in Amer­ica

The Covington News - - Front page -

Would some­body tell that guy that runs Mex­ico to buy a map?

Pres­i­dent Who­ever had the au­dac­ity to come to our coun­try and tell Congress he doesn’t like Ari­zona’s tough new im­mi­gra­tion laws. The last time I looked, Ari­zona wasn’t in Mex­ico so he should mind his own beeswax.

H e re­minds me of the guy who came to At­lanta as the French con­sul-gen­eral and promptly an­nounced that his coun­try was “firmly op­posed to cap­i­tal pun­ish­ment, re­mains ded­i­cated to its abo­li­tion and will con­tinue to deeply de­ploy all its ef­forts in that di­rec­tion.”

This from the Land of the Guil­lo­tine.

Mon­sieur Mus­ke­teer didn’t stay long. He’s lucky we didn’t try him for trea­son. We don’t take kindly to out­siders telling us how to run our busi­ness, be they from France or Philadel­phia.

Un­for­tu­nately, that doesn’t seem to bother the lib­eral wee­nies in Washington. When the Mex­i­can pres­i­dent got around to diss­ing Ari­zona be­cause they are do­ing what the fed­eral govern­ment won’t do and what Ge­or­gia should do if it wasn’t for all the spe­cial in­ter­ests and politi­cians that keep­ing us from en­forc­ing the law, the Democrats ap­plauded. Whose side are they on?

Why doesn’t Barack Obama tear him­self away from his teleprompters and go to Mex­ico and say to their Congress or what­ever passes for one, “If you ran your coun­try bet­ter, ev­ery­body would want to stay here and wouldn’t try to sneak into ours. If you can’t do that, then send the pe­sos to cover their costs. Oth­er­wise, we may try to sneak into Mex­ico and have our ba­bies in your hos­pi­tals. Muchas gracias.”

Of course, that would up­set the out-of-touch-with-re­al­ity news me­dia, the politi­cians who covet the His­panic vote so they can con­tinue to avoid hav­ing to find a real job, the spe­cial in­ter­est groups who make a liv­ing off of il­le­gal im­mi­grants, the con­struc­tion in­dus­try, agribusi­ness and left-lean­ing uni­ver­si­ties, among oth­ers.

The only peo­ple that would ap­plaud such a move would be the ma­jor­ity of the Amer­i­can peo­ple who see il­le­gal im­mi­gra­tion for what it is — il­le­gal.

Matt Towery, a na­tion­allysyn­di­cated colum­nist and CEO of polling firm In­sid­erAd­van­tage says his polls show that if you pro­pose to boy­cott Ari­zona be­cause of their im­mi­gra­tion laws, “You are cooked. Your in­dig­na­tion is only hard­en­ing the re­solve of those who have adopted a zero-tol­er­ance stance to­ward peo­ple liv­ing here il­le­gally.”

I won’t reprise the Jes­sica Colotl is­sue ex­cept to say that Towery’s poll shows most Ge­or­gians have no sym­pa­thy for her plight. Colotl was the il­le­gal im­mi­grant at Ken­ne­saw State Uni­ver­sity who was caught with no driver’s li­cense and who lied about where she lived. She says our sys­tem is “messed up.” I say she is the one who messed up.

How did Colotl get in Ken­ne­saw State in the first place? The State Board of Re­gents, the clos­est thing we have in this state to the Col­lege of Car­di­nals, say they can’t monitor who is le­gal and who is il­le­gal.

How­ever, in 2007 the Re­gents ruled that il­le­gal im­mi­grants at Ge­or­gia’s pub­lic uni­ver­si­ties could not re­ceive in-state tu­ition, but would be charged at the higher out-of-state rate. Which brings up the ob­vi­ous ques­tion: How do you know to charge them out-of­s­tate rates if you don’t know whether they are le­gal or not? And if they are il­le­gal, why are they at­tend­ing our pub­lic uni­ver­si­ties in the first place?

To be as smart as they are, the Board of Re­gents can be a lit­tle ob­fus­cat­ing at times.

In the mean­time, el Pres­i­dente has gone home and our fed­eral govern­ment con­tin­ues to dither over il­le­gal im­mi­gra­tion be­cause that is ba­si­cally all the fed­eral govern­ment is good for — dither­ing.

But there is some good news: At least he didn’t call for the abol­ish­ment of cap­i­tal pun­ish­ment while he was here.

I guess be­ing pres­i­dent of Mex­ico is pun­ish­ment enough.

NEWTON COUNTY'S NEWS­PA­PER SINCE 1865

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