Headed to D.C.

Clark cho­sen for Congress of Fu­ture Med­i­cal Lead­ers

The Covington News - - FRONT PAGE - DANIELLE EVER­SON de­v­er­son@cov­news.com

Newton High School fresh­man Jame­riah Clark has been nom­i­nated to at­tend the Congress of Fu­ture Med­i­cal Lead­ers pro­gram in Wash­ing­ton D.C., Feb. 14-16.

A Newton High School fresh­man will soon travel to the na­tion’s cap­i­tal for an hon­ors-only pro­gram that will fo­cus on teach­ing as­pir­ing med­i­cal pro­fes­sion­als more about med­i­cal sci­ence and honor some of Amer­ica’s high­est-achiev­ing high school stu­dents.

Jame­riah Clark has been nom­i­nated to at­tend the Congress of Fu­ture Med­i­cal Lead­ers pro­gram in Wash­ing­ton, D.C., Feb. 1416.

The pro­gram is for high school stu­dents who want to be­come physi­cians or go into med­i­cal re­search fields. Stu­dents must have a min­i­mum 3.5 grade-point av­er­age to at­tend.

The three-day pro­gram will honor, mo­ti­vate and di­rect stu­dents pur­su­ing med­i­cal ca­reers by pro­vid­ing them with paths, plans and re­sources.

Dr. Con­nie Mar­i­ano, med­i­cal di­rec­tor of the Na­tional Academy of Fu­ture Physi­cians and Med­i­cal Sci­en­tists, nom­i­nated Clark to rep­re­sent Ge­or­gia based on her aca­demic achieve­ment, lead­er­ship and de­ter­mi­na­tion to serve in the field of medicine, a news re­lease said.

Clark, also a Newton Col­lege and Ca­reer Academy as­so­ci­ate, will join stu­dents from across the coun­try who will have the chance to lis­ten to No­bel Lau­re­ates and Na­tional Medal of Sci­ence win­ners talk about lead­ing med­i­cal re­search; hear ad­vice from Ivy League and top med­i­cal school deans on what to ex­pect in med­i­cal school; and hear the sto­ries of pa­tients who are liv­ing med­i­cal mir­a­cles.

In ad­di­tion, stu­dents will hear from teen med­i­cal-sci­ence prodi­gies and learn about cut­ting-edge ad­vances and the fu­ture of medicine and med­i­cal tech­nol­ogy.

At the con­clu­sion of the event, the Congress of Fu­ture Med­i­cal Lead­ers will award three schol­ar­ships — a full-tu­ition schol­ar­ship up to $185,000; and two $10,000 schol­ar­ships, all to at­tend med­i­cal school — some­thing Clark said she love to have.

“I am su­per-ex­cited to be at­tend­ing the Congress. I have never been to D.C., so I’m very anx­ious to see the city and meet all of the other ea­ger stu­dents from around the coun­try,” Clark said.

“From this ex­pe­ri­ence, I be­lieve I will be an eye­wit­ness to all of the amaz­ing ways med­i­cal sci­ence has ad­vanced the world and see how it has evolved over time. I ex­pect to get a deeper un­der­stand­ing about the med­i­cal field and the ba­sic fun­da­men­tals that could pos­si­bly be help­ful in my fu­ture ca­reer,” she said.

“Also, I hope to be able to dis­cover many dif­fer­ent ca­reers in the med­i­cal field that aren’t very com­mon in to­day’s so­ci­ety; that would give me a chance to ex­plore my op­tions for ca­reers be­fore col­lege.”

Richard Rossi, ex­ec­u­tive di­rec­tor of the Na­tional Academy of Fu­ture Physi­cians and Med­i­cal Sci­en­tists, said in a news re­lease that this is a cru­cial time in Amer­ica, when more doc­tors and med­i­cal sci­en­tists are needed.

“Fo­cused, bright and de­ter­mined stu­dents like Jame­riah Clark are our fu­ture, and she de­serves all the men­tor­ing and guid­ance we can give her,” Rossi said.

Ac­cord­ing to in­for­ma­tion from the NAFPMS, the med­i­cal or­ga­ni­za­tion based in Wash­ing­ton was founded on the be­lief that prospec­tive med­i­cal tal­ent should be iden­ti­fied at the ear­li­est pos­si­ble age and given help to ac­quire the nec­es­sary ex­pe­ri­ence and skills for a med­i­cal ca­reer.

Sub­mit­ted photo /The Cov­ing­ton News

Newton High School fresh­man Jame­riah Clark has been nom­i­nated to at­tend a lead­er­ship pro­gram in Wash­ing­ton, D.C., Feb. 14-16.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.