Let. Him. In.

The Covington News - - SPORTS - SHA­KEEM HOL­LOWAY SPORTS EDI­TOR

It’s been 25 years since Pete Rose’s life­time ban came down from Ma­jor League Base­ball. Now is the time to lift Rose’s ban and let him into the Hall of Fame.

Rose is a leg­end for two rea­sons: he is ar­guably the best player of all-time own­ing mul­ti­ple MLB records and he gam­bled on his team to win, and was banned for life be­cause of it.

Rose was ex­iled from base­ball for gam­bling, and if you take into ac­count the 1919 World Se­ries Black Sox Scan­dal, it seemed like a good idea at the time.

Two decades and-ahalf later, the idea seems sim­ply triv­ial. No one has dis­graced the game of base­ball more than the mass amount of steroid users that have come and gone (some re­main) since Rose’s ban.

Yet, people who cheated their way into the game or to the up­per ech­e­lons of the league get slap-on-thewrist sus­pen­sions (that is un­less you’re a re­peat of­fender, hi A-Rod), but are even­tu­ally al­lowed back into the game.

I find it in­cred­i­bly per­plex­ing and some­what hyp­o­crit­i­cal that people who have ei­ther ad­mit­ted to steroid use or failed drug tests are al­lowed to be voted into the hall of fame (al­though, they’ll prob­a­bly never make it), but a guy who’s bet­ter than many steroid users isn’t even al­lowed on the bal­lot.

Also, we must ac­count for the fact that Rose only BET ON HIS TEAM TO WIN. Mean­ing the guy ba­si­cally said, ‘Hey, I play for/man­age this team and I think we’re go­ing to go out there and de­stroy the op­po­si­tion, and I’d like to make some money off of it.’

His many records have stood the test of time and steroids, yet we won’t al­low him into the Hall of Fame be­cause he had the con­fi­dence in him­self and his team to win games?

I know some people con­sider it a dis­grace­ful act to bet on or against a team you play for in any facet, and I get that. I re­ally do. But, does the pun­ish­ment fit the crime? No, it doesn’t.

I also know Rose agreed to the ban. Fine. He agreed to a ban that shouldn’t have been handed down in the first place. I’m sure Rose has sat through the years re­gret­ting that de­ci­sion, but this is ‘Murica,’ the land of sec­ond chances. One that Rose is long over­due for.

Did he agree to the ban? Yep, sure did. Did he com­mit the crime? Ab­so­lutely. But, is he one of base­ball’s most her­alded play­ers of all­time based on his pro­duc­tion as a player? Yes, he is.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.