CUR­RENT RE­LEASES

The Dallas Morning News - - MOVIES - Com­piled by Aaron Colen, from staff and wire re­ports

A-

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST This smartly cast story brings sub­tle up­grades to the time­less clas­sic, adding new songs and pay­ing ho­mage to the splen­did vi­su­als in­spired by the an­i­mated and stage ver­sions. Star­ring Emma Wat­son, Dan Stevens, Ewan McGre­gor, Luke Evans and Ian McKellen. PG (ac­tion vi­o­lence, peril and fright­en­ing images). 129 mins.

B+

THE BOSS BABY Ev­ery joke has a pay­off in this an­i­mated tale of a talk­ing baby (voiced by Alec Bald­win) whose de­meanor is more cor­po­rate CEO than di­a­per dandy. It will please the kids, and there are plenty of tugs at nostal­gia for par­ents, too. PG (mild rude hu­mor). 97 mins.

THE CASE FOR CHRIST (Not re­viewed.) Jour­nal­ist Lee Stro­bel be­gins a quest to de­bunk the claims of Chris­tian­ity in an at­tempt to save his mar­riage af­ter his wife adopts the faith, but he finds un­ex­pected re­sults that change ev­ery­thing he be­lieves to be true. This drama is based on Stro­bel’s award-win­ning book. Di­rected by Jon Gunn. PG (the­matic ele­ments in­clud­ing med­i­cal de­scrip­tions of cru­ci­fix­ion, and in­ci­den­tal smok­ing). 112 mins.

CHIPS (Not re­viewed.) Dax Shep­ard di­rects and stars along­side Michael Peña. They play a pair of Cal­i­for­nia High­way Pa­trol of­fi­cers in this movie adap­ta­tion of the tele­vi­sion se­ries from the 1970s and ’80s. R (crude sex­ual con­tent, graphic nu­dity, per­va­sive lan­guage, some vi­o­lence and drug use). 101 mins.

B-

COLOS­SAL Anne Hath­away fully em­braces the role of a down-on-her-luck drunk who stum­bles on an un­ex­pected road to re­cov­ery. By the end, the char­ac­ter’s heroic stature is both im­prob­a­ble and un­de­ni­able, and it stems less from what she’s done than from what she’s fi­nally stopped let­ting others do. R (lan­guage). 110 mins.

C

A DOG’S PUR­POSE A puppy (voiced by Josh Gad) is rein­car­nated as var­i­ous breeds across the decades in this adorable but for­get­table film. PG (the­matic ele­ments and some peril). 120 mins.

C+

THE FATE OF THE FU­RI­OUS The se­ries’ eighth in­stall­ment has ev­ery­thing the fran­chise’s fans crave, and it has mo­ments that are still a heck of a lot of fun. But it’s a come­down from the gas-fume highs of the last three films. Star­ring Vin Diesel, Michelle Ro­driguez, Dwayne Johnson, Char­l­ize Theron, Chris “Lu­dacris” Bridges and Kurt Rus­sell. PG-13 (pro­longed se­quences of vi­o­lence and de­struc­tion, sug­ges­tive con­tent and strong lan­guage). 136 mins.

FIFTY SHADES DARKER (Not re­viewed.) A re­union be­tween Chris­tian and Ana (Jamie Dor­nan and Dakota Johnson) is threat­ened by a shady char­ac­ter from his past in this fol­low-up to the kinky drama. R (strong erotic sex­ual con­tent, some graphic nu­dity and lan­guage). 115 mins.

B-

FIST FIGHT This com­edy is a pleas­antly foul-mouthed ex­er­cise that gets by on the chem­istry of its two stars: Ice Cube, with his NWA-trained death glare, and Char­lie Day, who ba­si­cally re­cy­cles his lik­able, hap­less yet in­ven­tive char­ac­ter from It’s Al­ways Sunny in Philadel­phia into a more re­spon­si­ble sub­ur­ban dad. R (strong lan­guage through­out, sex­ual con­tent/nu­dity and drug ma­te­rial). 91 mins.

A-

FRANTZ French film­maker François Ozon’s care­fully cal­i­brated med­i­ta­tion on loss and rec­on­cil­i­a­tion, set in Ger­many af­ter World War I, is the un­like­li­est of love sto­ries. It brings pro­found in­sights about for­give­ness, per­se­ver­ance and re­spon­si­bil­ity. PG-13 (the­matic ele­ments in­clud­ing brief war vi­o­lence). 114 mins.

B

GET OUT Writer-di­rec­tor Jor­dan Peele of­fers a chill­ing por­trait of the racism that can lurk be­neath smil­ing white faces in this hor­ror film about a black man who goes to visit his white girl­friend’s par­ents at their ru­ral es­tate. Star­ring Daniel Kalu­uya and Allison Wil­liams. R (vi­o­lence, bloody images and lan­guage in­clud­ing sex­ual ref­er­ences). 103 mins.

B

GHOST IN THE SHELL Scar­lett Jo­hans­son stars as Ma­jor, a hu­man saved from a ter­ri­ble crash who has been cy­ber-en­hanced into the per­fect sol­dier and crime fighter. The mind and spirit of the 1995 orig­i­nal film have been pre­served in this re­make, di­rected by Ru­pert San­ders. Also star­ring Pilou As­baek and Takeshi Ki­tano. PG-13 (se­quences of sci-fi vi­o­lence, sug­ges­tive con­tent and some dis­turb­ing images). 106 mins.

B-

GIFTED Chris Evans, putting down the star-em­bla­zoned shield, demon­strates his chops be­yond the Avengers uni­verse in this ex­ceed­ingly pleas­ant tale of a young prodigy and the uncle who en­cour­ages her to just be a kid. De­spite its re­laxed charms, the film is ham­pered by a ten­dency to­ward the over­wrought and un­re­al­is­tic in the realm of the court­room drama. PG-13 (the­matic ele­ments, lan­guage and some sug­ges­tive ma­te­rial). 101 mins.

B

GO­ING IN STYLE Life­long friends Will (Mor­gan Free­man), Joe (Michael Caine) and Al (Alan Arkin) de­cide to break out of the straight and nar­row path of re­tire­ment af­ter their pen­sion funds be­come a cor­po­rate ca­su­alty. Zach Braff’s

di­rec­tion isn’t per­fect, but it does the im­por­tant things right. PG-13 (drug con­tent, lan­guage and some sug­ges­tive ma­te­rial). 97 mins.

B

HID­DEN FIG­URES The pre­vi­ously un­told story about the African-Amer­i­can women who worked at NASA when as­tro­naut John Glenn was first sent into or­bit is grat­i­fy­ing but not great. PG (themes and lan­guage). 127 mins.

B

KONG: SKULL IS­LAND This ac­tion movie has a smart script, imag­i­na­tive film­mak­ing and a cast of fine ac­tors who ac­tu­ally get to act. King Kong has never looked so good. Star­ring Tom Hid­dle­ston, Samuel L. Jack­son, Brie Lar­son, John Good­man and John C. Reilly. PG-13 (sci-fi vi­o­lence and ac­tion, and brief strong lan­guage). 118 mins.

B+

LA LA LAND Two beau­ti­ful young artists — a pi­anist (Ryan Gosling) and an ac­tress (Emma Stone) — find them­selves in the bliss­ful early stages of love in this of­ten-cap­ti­vat­ing mu­si­cal. Di­rected by Damien Chazelle. PG-13 (lan­guage). 128 mins.

B+

THE LEGO BAT­MAN MOVIE A lonely vig­i­lante hero must learn to work with others to save Gotham from the Joker’s at­tempted takeover in this funny an­i­mated par­ody. Fea­tur­ing the voices of Will Ar­nett, Michael Cera, Rosario Daw­son and Zach Gal­i­fi­anakis. PG (rude hu­mor and some ac­tion). 104 mins.

B

LIFE Six crew mem­bers on the In­ter­na­tional Space Sta­tion discover the first ev­i­dence of life on Mars, and their re­search re­veals that the life form is both in­tel­li­gent and dan­ger­ous. While the film bor­rows much from Alien, it is a wel­come ad­di­tion to the science-fic­tion/hor­ror genre. Star­ring Jake Gyl­len­haal, Re­becca Fer­gu­son and Ryan Reynolds. Di­rected by Daniel Espinosa. R (lan­guage through­out, some sci-fi vi­o­lence and ter­ror). 103 mins.

B+

LION An In­dian man who was adopted by an Aus­tralian fam­ily as a child sets out to find his lost fam­ily in this heart­warm­ing tale. PG-13 (the­matic ma­te­rial and some sen­su­al­ity). 118 mins.

B+

LO­GAN In Hugh Jack­man’s last stab at the X-Men icon, Wolver­ine’s vul­ner­a­bil­ity makes us like him more than ever. The film earns its R rat­ing with a bleak set­ting and a high body count. Also star­ring Pa­trick Ste­wart. R (strong vi­o­lence and lan­guage and brief nu­dity). 137 mins.

C

POWER RANGERS This ser­vice­able rein­ven­tion of the TV se­ries Mighty Mor­phin Power Rangers man­ages to be cheesy even by 1990s teen ac­tion show stan­dards, but fans of the orig­i­nal se­ries will find their fa­vorite ele­ments in the movie. Di­rected by Dean Is­raelite. PG-13 (sci-fi vi­o­lence ac­tion and de­struc­tion, lan­guage and crude hu­mor). 124 mins.

A-

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY This tale of war, re­pres­sion and re­bel­lion is not only the best Star Wars pre­quel film, it’s also a movie that stands im­pres­sively tall on its own mer­its. Star­ring Felic­ity Jones, Diego Luna and Alan Tudyk. PG-13 (sci-fi vi­o­lence and ac­tion). 133 mins.

B

THE SHACK Though the dia­logue in this faith-based drama about a way­ward soul has all the fi­nesse of a self-help book, and the vi­su­als are a gar­ish tech­ni­color ex­plo­sion, there are some nuggets of wis­dom that res­onate, re­gard­less of per­sonal be­lief. Star­ring Sam Worthington, Oc­tavia Spencer and

Tim McGraw. PG (the­matic ma­te­rial in­clud­ing some vi­o­lence). 132 mins.

C-

SMURFS: THE LOST VIL­LAGE This an­i­mated tale has enough bright col­ors and slap­stick hu­mor to en­chant its tar­get au­di­ence. But any­one much taller than a Smurf may turn blue. Fea­tur­ing the voices of Mandy Patinkin, Jeff Dun­ham, Danny Pudi and Demi Lo­vato. PG (mild ac­tion and rude hu­mor). 81 mins.

B+

THEIR FINEST This movie about making a movie, specif­i­cally a glossy pro­pa­ganda film meant to bol­ster morale in WWII Bri­tain, is good-look­ing, finely acted and well-told. Star­ring Gemma Arter­ton, Jack Hus­ton and Sam Claflin. R (lan­guage and a scene of sex­u­al­ity). 110 mins.

B-

TOMMY’S HON­OUR This drama is based on the true story of the re­la­tion­ship be­tween Tom Mor­ris (Peter Mul­lan) and Tommy Mor­ris (Jack Low­den), the fa­ther-son team who ush­ered in the mod­ern game of golf. The duo ex­pe­ri­ences chal­lenges and tragedy in a way that is both uni­ver­sally ef­fec­tive and fa­mil­iar to au­di­ences. Di­rected by Ja­son Con­nery. PG (the­matic ele­ments, some sug­ges­tive ma­te­rial, lan­guage and smok­ing). 112 mins.

B

T2 TRAINSPOT­TING This se­quel re­unites the old gang from the de­press­ing yet ex­hil­a­rat­ing 1996 cult clas­sic. T2 is lighter in tone, the ac­cents aren’t as thick and the drug use isn’t as hor­ri­fy­ing. Still, it’s a lot of dark fun, and di­rec­tor Danny Boyle keeps ev­ery­thing mov­ing quickly. Star­ring Ewan McGre­gor, Ewen Brem­ner, Jonny Lee Miller and Robert Car­lyle. R (drug use, lan­guage, graphic nu­dity and vi­o­lence). 117 mins.

B

YOUR NAME Two high school kids — com­plete strangers liv­ing sep­a­rate lives — ran­domly switch places on mul­ti­ple oc­ca­sions and find them­selves in­hab­it­ing the other per­son’s body. They soon use this bizarre cir­cum­stance to their ad­van­tage, com­mu­ni­cat­ing with each other by leav­ing notes and mes­sages, even­tu­ally build­ing a bond. What starts out as a Freaky Fri­day-type body ex­change be­comes a ru­mi­na­tion on time travel, cat­a­clysmic fate and ru­ral-ur­ban dy­nam­ics — and, of course, a love story. Di­rected by Makoto Shinkai. PG (sug­ges­tive con­tent, lan­guage and smok­ing). 106 mins.

B

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE A Warsaw zoo be­comes a haven for Jews flee­ing Nazi per­se­cu­tion dur­ing World War II. Though the film has flaws in pac­ing and sus­pense, they’re eas­ily over­looked thanks to Jessica Chastain’s soul-bar­ing per­for­mance. PG-13 (dis­turb­ing images, vi­o­lence, brief sex­u­al­ity, nu­dity and smok­ing). 124 mins.

Ni­cola Dove/STX En­ter­tain­ment

Gemma Arter­ton plays a writer on a Bri­tish pro­pa­ganda film in Their Finest.

Matt Kennedy/Uni­ver­sal Pic­tures

Dwayne Johnson in The Fate of the Fu­ri­ous

Neon

Anne Hath­away and Ja­son Sudeikis co-star as home­town friends in Colos­sal, di­rected by Na­cho Vi­ga­londo.

Kim­berly French/Lion­s­gate

Power Rangers brings back fa­vorite ele­ments, in all their cheesy glory, from the 1990s TV show Mighty Mor­phin Power Rangers.

Anne Marie Fox/Fo­cus Fea­tures

Jessica Chastain stars in The Zookeeper’s Wife, which takes place dur­ing World War II.

Sony Pic­tures

A scene from Smurfs: The Lost Vil­lage

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