LIFE & CUL­TURE

“Wendy is telling every­body that I’m a few tacos short of a com­bi­na­tion plate when I’m de­clarer,” Cy the Cynic told me in the club lounge. Cy, a chau­vin­ist, and

The Denver Post - - LIFE & CULTURE - By Frank Ste­wart Daily Ques­tion:

Wendy, our fem­i­nist, are al­ways at odds.

“She’s say­ing your dummy play is weak?”

“It’s shame­ful,” Cy growled. “But two can play that game. Let me show you a deal from our penny game.”

It seemed that Wendy had played at four hearts. She won West’s trump lead in dummy and tried a club to her queen. West won and shifted to a di­a­mond: three, king, eight.

“Wendy won the club re­turn,” Cy told me, “drew trumps and let the jack of di­a­monds ride. East took the queen and cashed the ace of spades. Down one. Wendy blew it and should be held pub­licly ac­count­able.”

I wish Cy and Wendy would make peace, but Wendy could have made four hearts. Af­ter she draws trumps, she leads a spade to her king. She next takes the A-J of clubs, pitch­ing a spade from dummy, and ex­its with a spade. When East wins, he is end-played. You hold: A10632 7 ( KQ4 $ 10 8 7 2. Your part­ner opens one heart, you re­spond one spade and he bids two di­a­monds. What do you say? An­swer: This is a bru­tal prob­lem in “Stan­dard” meth­ods, where opener’s min­i­mum change of suit cov­ers a wide range of hands. Your part­ner could have 4, A K 865,AJ72,943or4,AK865,AJ1098, A 3. To pass would be timid. Raise to three di­a­monds, though you would rather have a fourth di­a­mond. by Dana Sum­mers

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