DATA MAY HAVE BEEN COM­PRO­MISED

The pri­vate health in­for­ma­tion for 822 peo­ple could have been com­pro­mised by a glitch.

The Denver Post - - FRONT PAGE - By Jen­nifer Brown Jen­nifer Brown: 303-954-1593, jen­brown@den­ver­post.com or @jbrownd­post

The tech­nol­ogy com­pany at the cen­ter of an on­go­ing Med­i­caid pay­ment fi­asco in Colorado now says a sys­tem glitch might have in­ad­ver­tently shared the pri­vate health in­for­ma­tion of 822 peo­ple. The prob­lem comes after months of com­plaints about DXC Tech­nol­ogy’s fail­ure to re­im­burse doc­tors, ther­a­pists and oth­ers who care for needy and dis­abled Coloradans. »

The tech­nol­ogy com­pany at the cen­ter of an on­go­ing Med­i­caid pay­ment fi­asco in Colorado now says a sys­tem glitch might have in­ad­ver­tently shared the pri­vate health in­for­ma­tion of 822 peo­ple.

The prob­lem re­vealed Thurs­day comes after months of com­plaints about DXC Tech­nol­ogy’s fail­ure to re­im­burse doc­tors, ther­a­pists and oth­ers who care for needy and dis­abled Coloradans.

The state Med­i­caid depart­ment con­tracted with DXC Tech­nol­ogy to run its re­vamped pay­ment sys­tem.

It went live March 1, and im­me­di­ately health care providers who care for peo­ple with Med­i­caid gov­ern­ment in­sur­ance com­plained their re­quests for re­im­burse­ment were de­nied or stalled. Small ther­a­pists’ and doc­tors’ of­fices were forced to take out loans, bor­row­ing against their homes or on their credit cards in or­der to pay their em­ploy­ees.

After the launch, wait times at a call cen­ter for health providers whose claims were re­jected were reach­ing three hours. DXC has since added more work­ers to its call cen­ter.

The tech­nol­ogy com­pany and the Colorado Depart­ment of Health Care Pol­icy and Fi­nanc­ing, which man­ages the Med­i­caid pro­gram, said a se­cu­rity re­view de­ter­mined that the “pro­tected health in­for­ma­tion” of 822 peo­ple was “po­ten­tially ac­ces­si­ble” from March 1 to May 10.

An in­ter­net hy­per­link to 12 Med­i­caid billing re­ports con­tain­ing the pro­tected in­for­ma­tion may have been ac­ces­si­ble for more than two months.

The pa­tients whose records were po­ten­tially breached have been no­ti­fied, DXC Tech­nol­ogy said.

The billing re­ports in­cluded pa­tient names and Med­i­caid num­bers, as well as their doc­tors’ names and ad­dresses, the type of med­i­cal ser­vices they re­ceived and on what dates. It also in­cluded cost of ser­vices. The in­for­ma­tion did not in­clude So­cial Se­cu­rity num­bers, birth dates or ad­dresses of the pa­tients, DXC said.

“While DXC Tech­nol­ogy has no rea­son to be­lieve this in­for­ma­tion has been used in­ap­pro­pri­ately, DXC is of­fer­ing one year of free credit pro­tec­tion ser­vice to im­pacted in­di­vid­u­als,” the com­pany said in a news re­lease.

Med­i­caid pa­tients can call 844235-2387 and “press op­tion 2, then press op­tion 7 to speak with an agent,” ac­cord­ing to the news re­lease.

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