Haifa Hos­pi­tal Tests First Im­plant for Heart Fail­ure

Cana­dian pa­tient flew to Is­rael for the pro­ce­dure af­ter his wife read about the ex­per­i­men­tal im­plant on­line and his car­di­ol­o­gist en­cour­aged him

The Jewish Voice - - HEALTH - By: Is­rael 21C Staff

A72-year old Cana­dian man has be­come the world's first re­cip­i­ent of an Is­raeli-de­vel­oped im­plant to treat di­as­tolic heart fail­ure – a fairly com­mon con­di­tion for which there is no ef­fec­tive long-term treat­ment.

The min­i­mally in­va­sive surgery was per­formed on July 26th at Ram­bam Health Care Cam­pus, a med­i­cal cen­ter in Haifa, by a mul­ti­dis­ci­plinary team led by car­di­ol­o­gists Gil Bolotin, di­rec­tor of car­diac surgery, and Arthur Kerner, se­nior physi­cian in the In­ter­ven­tional Car­di­ol­ogy Unit.

The im­plant, called CORolla, was de­vel­oped by Is­raeli startup CorAs­sist Car­dio­vas­cu­lar of Haifa. The elas­tic de­vice is im­planted in­side the left ven­tri­cle of the heart and can im­prove car­diac di­as­tolic func­tion by ap­ply­ing di­rect ex­pan­sion force on the ven­tri­cle wall to help the heart fill with blood.

The CorAs­sist tech­nol­ogy was in­vented by Dr. Yair Feld, a Ram­bam car­di­ol­o­gist, with doc­tors Yo­tam Reis­ner and Shay Dubi.

The pa­tient, Robert MacLach­lan, ex­plained that he had run out of treat­ment op­tions in Canada for his di­as­tolic heart fail­ure. His wife had read about the CORolla im­plant on the In­ter­net and con­tacted Dr. Karen Bit­ton Worms, head of re­search in the de­part­ment of car­diac surgery at Ram­bam. MacLach­lan's car­di­ol­o­gist en­cour­aged him to ap­ply to have the ex­per­i­men­tal pro­ce­dure in Is­rael.

Bolotin said that while many po­ten­tial ap­pli­cants were in­ter­ested in the pro­ce­dure, no one wanted to be first un­til MacLach­lan came along.

“I am proud that Ram­bam of­fers treat­ments to pa­tients not avail­able any­where else in the world,” com­mented Dr. Rafi Be­yar, di­rec­tor and CEO of Ram­bam.

The hos­pi­tal did not com­ment on the con­di­tion of the pa­tient, but in a video re­leased a month af­ter the pro­ce­dure Ma-

The elas­tic de­vice is im­planted in­side the left ven­tri­cle of the heart and can im­prove car­diac di­as­tolic func­tion by ap­ply­ing di­rect ex­pan­sion force on the ven­tri­cle wall to help the heart fill with blood.

cLach­lan said he al­ready feels bet­ter and has no­ticed that his skin color looks healthy for the first time in a long time.

The Is­rael Min­istry of Health has au­tho­rized up to 10 clin­i­cal tri­als at Ram­bam to test the ef­fi­cacy of car­diac catheter­i­za­tion for place­ment of the CORolla im­plant.

The po­ten­tial mar­ket for the de­vice is large. It is es­ti­mated that more than 23 mil­lion peo­ple world­wide suf­fer from heart fail­ure, a con­di­tion in which the heart fails to pump suf­fi­cient oxy­genated blood to meet the body's needs.

Ap­prox­i­mately half of heart fail­ure pa­tients suf­fer from di­as­tolic heart fail­ure, in which the left ven­tri­cle fails to re­lax and ad­e­quately re­fill with blood, re­sult­ing in a high fill­ing pres­sure, con­ges­tion and short­ness of breath. This is the con­di­tion for which the CORolla de­vice was in­vented.

Car­di­ol­o­gist Gil Bolotin check­ing pa­tient Robert MacLach­lan, the first in the world to re­ceive the CORolla im­plant, at Ram­bam Health Care Cam­pus, Haifa. Photo by Pioter Fliter/RHCC

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