Step aside, cran­ber­ries. Try th­ese Thanksgiving chut­neys

The Reporter (Lansdale, PA) - - FOOD - By The Culi­nary In­sti­tute of Amer­ica

If you don’t like cran­ber­ries, Thanksgiving is prob­a­bly your worst night­mare. It’s ba­si­cally the only time of the year that they make an ap­pear­ance, and if you don’t eat cran­berry sauce, well, why even bother? Af­ter all, the undis­puted best part of Thanksgiving is as­sem­bling the per­fect bite of turkey, stuff­ing, and cran­berry sauce.

Not be­ing into cran­berry sauce doesn’t mean that you can’t or shouldn’t ap­pre­ci­ate what is great about it. Cran­berry sauce works be­cause it’s the lightly sweet, ul­tra-tart foil to the other rich foods on our plate. Think about it. Your plate has turkey smoth­ered in gravy (rich), stuff­ing (so rich), mashed pota­toes (the king of rich), plus what­ever other but­ter-cov­ered, cream-filled, but­ter-milk-soaked foods your fam­ily makes every year.

But that bite of cran­berry sauce helps to cleanse your palate of that some­what grimy feel­ing that can come in be­tween bites of bis­cuit and corn pud­ding. For the same rea­son, it’s the per­fect spread for your post-Thanksgiving sand­wich (the undis­puted sec­ond-best part of Thanksgiving).

But de­spite to­tally cor­ner­ing the mar­ket on Thanksgiving fruits, cran­ber­ries are not the be-all and en­dall when it comes to sauc­ing your hol­i­day ta­ble. Th­ese three chut­ney recipes from The Culi­nary In­sti­tute of Amer­ica are fresh al­ter­na­tives to sliced “can-berry”

that hit the same spot from a dif­fer­ent an­gle.

Chut­neys are typ­i­cally a sweet, sour, and sa­vory com­bi­na­tion of fruits, veg­eta­bles, and spices that are cooked to a stewed con­sis­tency. CIA Chef John Kowal­ski ex­plains, “Chut­ney con­tains fruit and sugar to give it a sweet taste, and al­most all chut­ney con­tains vine­gar and per­haps onions to give it a cor­re­spond­ing sour fla­vor. Like jams and jel­lies, chut­ney can be chunky or smooth. In In­dia, spicy chut­ney is usu­ally served with curry and of­ten with cold meats and veg­eta­bles.”

The Fall Vegetable Chut­ney, which is sim­i­lar to an Ital­ian caponata, uses the last of the sea­son’s farm­stand in­gre­di­ents, like toma­toes, bell pep­pers, and egg­plant. Be­cause chut­neys are cooked un­til they’re soft, it’s a great op­por­tu­nity to use some of the pro­duce you may have stored away in the freezer.

All of th­ese recipes are great as writ­ten, but they’re also a good jump­ing-off point for your own ex­per­i­men­ta­tion. The Mus­tard Fruits recipe uses dried dates, apri­cots, and ap­ples, but you can use any of your fa­vorite dried fruits, like raisins, pears, or figs. And the Cran­berry-Pineap­ple Chut­ney would be just as de­li­cious with man­goes and the ad­di­tion of sa­vory ground cumin.

Whether you make one of th­ese rel­ishes or all three, keep in mind that they are the per­fect make-ahead items. Prepare the chut­neys a week ahead of time, and you’ll find that they only get bet­ter once the fla­vors have time to min­gle.

And they aren’t only good on the din­ner ta­ble. Use the Cran­berry-Pineap­ple Chut­ney as a pair­ing with dried sausages or pâtés, the Mus­tard Fruits for a sa­vory baked brie, and the Fall Vegetable Chut­ney for a cros­tini top­per with a sprin­kle of goat cheese. With all of th­ese uses, you might even find room on the ta­ble for the cran­berry sauce.

FALL VEGETABLE CHUT­NEY

Makes about 3 cups Start to fin­ish: 40 min­utes (Ac­tive time: 15 min­utes) IN­GRE­DI­ENTS

1 red bell pep­per, seeded and chopped

1 green bell pep­per, seeded and chopped

1 medium egg­plant (about 1 pound), chopped

2 plum toma­toes, chopped ½ yel­low onion, chopped 3 cloves gar­lic, thinly sliced 1 cup white wine vine­gar 1 ta­ble­spoon brown sugar ¼ tea­spoon kosher salt ¼ tea­spoon crushed red pep­per flakes ¼ tea­spoon ground cloves In a large saucepan, com­bine the bell pep­pers, egg­plant, toma­toes, onion, gar­lic, vine­gar, brown sugar, salt, pep­per flakes, and cloves. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then re­duce to a sim­mer. Cover and cook un­til the veg­eta­bles be­gin to soften, about 10 min­utes. Uncover and cook, stir­ring

oc­ca­sion­ally, un­til the veg­eta­bles are soft­ened and the sauce has re­duced to a syrup con­sis­tency, about 25 min­utes. Serve warm or at room tem­per­a­ture.

MUS­TARD FRUITS

Makes about 2½ cups Start to fin­ish: 55 min­utes (Ac­tive time: 20 min­utes) IN­GRE­DI­ENTS ¼ cup maple syrup 1 cup white wine vine­gar 1 cup wa­ter 1 ta­ble­spoon whole grain mus­tard 2 cloves gar­lic, chopped ¼ tea­spoon kosher salt 1 cup apri­cots ½ cup pit­ted dates ½ cup dried ap­ples IN­STRUC­TIONS

In a medium saucepan, com­bine the maple syrup, vine­gar, wa­ter, mus­tard, gar­lic, and salt. Stir to com­bine, then add the apri­cots, dates, and ap­ples. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then re­duce to a sim­mer. Cook, stir­ring oc­ca­sion­ally, un­til the fruits are soft and the liq­uid has re­duced to a syrupy

con­sis­tency, about 50 min­utes. Serve warm or at room tem­per­a­ture.

CRAN­BERRY-PINEAP­PLE CHUT­NEY

Makes about 3½ cups Start to fin­ish: 20 min­utes IN­GRE­DI­ENTS

½ pineap­ple, chopped (about 4 cups)

1½ cups cran­ber­ries, fresh or frozen

1 ser­rano or jalapeño pep­per, seeded and minced ¼ cup golden raisins ½ cup ap­ple cider vine­gar ½ cup wa­ter ¼ cup brown sugar 1 tea­spoon ground gin­ger ¼ tea­spoon kosher salt IN­STRUC­TIONS

In a medium saucepan, com­bine the pineap­ple, cran­ber­ries, pep­pers, raisins, vine­gar, wa­ter, brown sugar, gin­ger, and salt. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then re­duce to a sim­mer. Cook, stir­ring oc­ca­sion­ally, un­til the pineap­ple is soft, the cran­ber­ries have burst, and the sauce is syrupy, about 15 min­utes (the mix­ture will thicken more as it cools). Serve warm or at room tem­per­a­ture.

Nu­tri­tion in­for­ma­tion per serv­ing of the Fall Vegetable Chut­ney: 13 calo­ries; 1 calo­ries from fat; 0 g fat (0 g sat­u­rated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg choles­terol; 21 mg sodium; 3 g car­bo­hy­drate; 1 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 0 g pro­tein.

Nu­tri­tion in­for­ma­tion per serv­ing of Mus­tard Fruits: 38 calo­ries; 0 calo­ries from fat; 0 g fat (0 g sat­u­rated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg choles­terol; 43 mg sodium; 9 g car­bo­hy­drate; 1 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 0 g pro­tein.

Nu­tri­tion in­for­ma­tion per serv­ing of Cran­ber­ryPineap­ple Chut­ney: 27 calo­ries; 0 calo­ries from fat; 0 g fat (0 g sat­u­rated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg choles­terol; 18 mg sodium; 7 g car­bo­hy­drate; 1 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 0 g pro­tein.

PHO­TOS BY PHIL MANS­FIELD — THE CULI­NARY IN­STI­TUTE OF AMER­ICA VIA AP

Th­ese pho­tos pro­vided by The Culi­nary In­sti­tute of Amer­ica shows Thanks­giv­ing chut­neys in Hyde Park, N.Y. from recipes by the CIA.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.