Thou­sands of wom­en­march in Philly

The Review - - Front Page - ByMar­ian Den­nis mden­nis@21st-cen­tu­ry­media.com @Mar­i­anDen­nis1 on Twit­ter

PHILADEL­PHIA >> “The peo­ple united can never be de­feated.”

That was just one of the phrases that rang out Satur­day morn­ing, Jan. 21, as thou­sands of women, men and fam­i­lies swarmed Lo­gan Cir­cle and spilled out onto Ben­jamin Franklin Park­way for the Women’s March on Philadel­phia.

The march­was started to send a mes­sage to newly in­au­gu­rated Pres­i­dent Trump and his ad­min­is­tra­tion that women’s rights are hu­man rights. The Philadel­phia march is one of many sis­ter marches to the Na­tional Women’s March on Wash­ing­ton, D.C. Other marches took place Satur­day in cities across the U.S. as well as other coun­tries.

“We want to bring at­ten­tion to the so­cial is­sues, health care is­sues, is­sues that I think have been over­looked in this elec­tion cy­cle by both par­ties ,” said Jen­nifer Moss holder of Gil­bertsville. “It was con­cern­ing last night when Trump was try­ing to dis­man­tle the ACA. So we’re com­ing out here to show that we’re not tak­ing it.”

Mossh­older had at­tended the event with sev­eral mem­bers of her fam­ily, who shared her views on the mat­ter.

“I’m here for ev­ery­thing re­ally. He can’t take away hu­man rights like this. It’s not OK,” said Ethan Mossh­older.

Mossh­older’s shared opin­ions spanned far be­yond her own fam­ily. Seas of signs piv­oted up and down as the sound of drum beats and other mu­sic could be heard above the chant­ing. What started out as a small crowd in the cir­cle evolved into a mass of sup­port­ers that, in a mat­ter of hours, filled Ben­jamin Franklin Park­way and sev­eral blocks sur­round­ing it.

While theMossh­old­ers had health care on their mind for the march, oth­ers had their own rea­sons for mak­ing their­way to the city on the damp, cloudy Satur­day.

“It’s time,” said Emily Dolan of Con­shohocken. “I don’t like the hate speech, I’m tired of the misog­yny. It can’t be rec­og­nized as ac­cept­able in big gov­ern­ment. We have rights. We have a voice. Women’s rights are hu­man rights.”

Emily at­tended the event with her wife, Sarah, and her sis­ter, Jen. Sarah added that the march held spe­cial mean­ing for her, par­tic­u­larly in terms of her mar­riage.

“We waited a while to be mar­ried,” said Sarah. “We got mar­ried in Con­necti­cut be­cause it wasn’t le­gal yet in Penn­syl­va­nia. So af­ter this elec­tion, I was re­ally scared and hope­fully that won’t get taken away from us.”

“I’m just hop­ing it’s go­ing to be a positive event,” said Jen. “That’s what we need more of, the pos­i­tiv­ity and bring­ing our voices to­gether to be heard.”

And there was plenty of pos­i­tiv­ity to go around. Smiles could be seen through­out the crowds as peo­ple stopped to read each other’s signs and ask about what brought them to the march. For one at­tendee, that rea­son was to pro­vide sol­i­dar­ity for the­wom­en­who were march­ing.

“I came here mainly be­cause I’ve seen a lot of worry amongst my friends, amongst peo­ple I sur­round my­self with and I’ve seen the harm that the Don­ald Trump has the

po­ten­tial to cause,” said Aidan Stan­ton of Collingswood, New Jer­sey. “I want to make my voice heard and try to help make other peo­ple’s voices heard. Hon­estly, I think we’re all here for the same rea­sons so I don’t see how my ex­pe­ri­ence is much dif­fer­ent from any­one else’s.”

Af­ter ev­ery­one made their way along the park­way, the masses gath­ered in front of the art mu­seum for a rally filled with var­i­ous per­for­mances and speak­ers in­clud­ing March Or­ga­nizer Emily Cooper Morse, Philadel­phia Mayor Jim Ken­ney and Con­gres­sional can­di­date Lindy Li.

“I think peo­ple are get­ting con­fused that we’re protest­ing that Trump is pres­i­dent,” added Jen­nifer Mossh­older. “Whether there’s in­ter­fer­ence with the elec­tion process or not he is our elected pres­i­dent and we’re not try­ing to change that fact here to­day. We’re try­ing to draw at­ten­tion to our is­sues that we would like our pres­i­dent to ad­dress. It’s not a protest about him and his pres­i­dency. It’s about what he should do go­ing for­ward.”

MAR­IAN DEN­NIS — DIG­I­TAL FIRST ME­DIA

A sea of signs over­took Lo­gan Cir­cle in Philadel­phia Satur­day, Jan. 21, for the Women’s March on Philadel­phia. The event was a sis­ter march to the Na­tional Women’s March on Wash­ing­ton and was cre­ated to give women a voice about their rights.

One at­tendee stands in Lo­gan Cir­cle hold­ing a sign for the Women’s March on Philadel­phia. The event drew thou­sands to the city to send themes­sage that women’s rights are hu­man rights.

As the Women’s March on Philadel­phia be­gan Satur­day morn­ing, Jan. 1, groups of women played the drums and thou­sands fol­lowed be­hind them hold­ing signs and chant­ing for equal­ity.

Thou­sands of peo­ple gath­ered in Lo­gan Cir­cle in Philadel­phia Satur­day, Jan. 21, to take part in the Women’s March on Philadel­phia. The event was a sis­ter march of the Na­tional Women’s March on Wash­ing­ton, D.C.

SUB­MIT­TED PHOTO

Signs of all kinds could be seen Satur­day, Jan. 21, dur­ing the Women’s March on Philadel­phia. The event was cre­ated to send the mes­sage that women’s rights are hu­man rights.

SUB­MIT­TED PHOTO

Marchers be­gan their walk down Ben­jamin Franklin High­way Satur­day morn­ing, Jan. 21, as part of the Women’s March on Philadel­phia.

MAR­IAN DEN­NIS — DIG­I­TAL FIRST ME­DIA

Mu­sic could be heard loud and clear Satur­day as par­tic­i­pants in the Women’s March on Philadel­phia helped lead the march with drums and other in­stru­ments.

MAR­IAN DEN­NIS — DIG­I­TAL FIRST ME­DIA

One marcher holds and Amer­i­can flag as the pro­ces­sion of peo­ple works its way down Ben­jamin Franklin Park­way. Thou­sands took part in the Women’s March on Philadel­phia Satur­day, Jan. 21, to voice their con­cerns to the new ad­min­is­tra­tion.

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