At­tack on the Kun­duz trauma cen­ter

The Washington Post Sunday - - FROM PAGE ONE - Source: Glob­alse­cu­rity.org, msf.org and www.aerospaceweb.org

The at­tack oc­curred be­tween 2:08 a.m. and 3:15 a.m. on Satur­day, Oct. 3. Afghan spe­cial forces were on the ground clear­ing Tal­iban in­sur­gents from ar­eas near the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Trauma Cen­ter.

Ac­cord­ing to Army Gen. John Camp­bell, Afghan troops re­ported they were un­der fire and re­quested air sup­port. An AC-130U Gun­ship was cir­cling over­head and struck the MSF fa­cil­ity. Hos­pi­tal of­fi­cials said they were as­saulted from the air for more than an hour.

AN ANTI-AIR­CRAFT WEAPON POINT­ING DOWN - THE BO­FORS L/70

The Bo­fors L/70 gun was orig­i­nally de­signed as an anti-air­craft weapon in the 1930s. Af­ter World War II, with the ad­vent of jet fight­ers, the L/70 model was in­tro­duced for en­gag­ing high-speed air­craft fly­ing at low al­ti­tude. It was first mounted in an AC-130 dur­ing the Viet­nam War.

AR­TILLERY FROM THE SKY - THE M102 HOW­ITZER

First in­tro­duced dur­ing the Viet­nam War, the M102 was a light-towed 105mm how­itzer used in light in­fantry oper­a­tions. It has been used on the AC-130 since the lat­ter stages of the Viet­nam War. The gun­ship usu­ally car­ries 96 rounds of am­mu­ni­tion for the gun.

Tal­iban within the hos­pi­tal?

While in­di­vid­u­als fa­mil­iar with the in­ci­dent say that U.S. forces iden­ti­fied fight­ers fir­ing from within the com­pound, MSF has strongly de­nied there were ac­tive Tal­iban on hos­pi­tal grounds.

THE DAM­AGE TO THE TRAUMA CEN­TER

The en­tire main hos­pi­tal build­ing was de­stroyed. “We tried to take a look into one of the burn­ing build­ings. I can­not de­scribe what was in­side. There are no words for how ter­ri­ble it was. In the in­ten­sive care unit, six pa­tients were burn­ing in their beds,” said nurse La­jos Zoltan Jecs on his blog on the MSF Web site.

“These are peo­ple who had been work­ing hard for months, non­stop for the past week,” Jecs said. “They had not gone home, they had not seen their fam­i­lies, they had just been work­ing in the hos­pi­tal to help peo­ple ... and now they are dead. These peo­ple are friends, close friends. I have no words to ex­press this. It is un­speak­able.”

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