More ter­ror, more de­nial

But Pres­i­dent-elect Trump rec­og­nizes that rad­i­cal Is­lamic ter­ror­ists are the en­emy

The Washington Times Daily - - OPINION - By Cal Thomas Cal Thomas is a na­tion­ally syndicated columnist. His lat­est book is “What Works: Com­mon Sense So­lu­tions for a Stronger Amer­ica” (Zon­der­van, 2014).

Re­cent ter­ror­ist at­tacks in Ankara, Tur­key, and Ber­lin, Ger­many, add to a grow­ing list of in­ci­dents that are be­com­ing in­creas­ingly dif­fi­cult to re­mem­ber. Does one be­gin the list with the plane hi­jack­ings in the ’60s and ’70s, or the first World Trade Cen­ter bomb­ing in 1993, or the USS Cole at­tack in 2000, or the sec­ond World Trade Cen­ter at­tack in 2001, or Ft. Hood, San Bernardino, Or­lando, Paris or Nice? And that’s not all of them, nor will it be the end of them, if we don’t have a bet­ter re­sponse.

Dur­ing the great wave of im­mi­gra­tion in the early-20th cen­tury, the United States barred those af­flicted with tu­ber­cu­lo­sis, vene­real dis­ease, tra­choma and other se­ri­ous dis­eases from en­ter­ing the coun­try. Now a dif­fer­ent kind of in­fec­tion is in­vad­ing Europe and in­creas­ingly the United States. It’s called rad­i­cal Is­lamic ter­ror­ism. The West con­tin­ues to ad­mit peo­ple from ter­ror­ist coun­tries, peo­ple who have been in­fected with this killer dis­ease, seem­ingly fear­ing the af­flic­tion less than be­ing la­beled in­tol­er­ant.

How is that work­ing out? So afraid of be­ing charged with Is­lam­o­pho­bia, Ger­man Chan­cel­lor An­gela Merkel ad­mit­ted more than 1 mil­lion refugees in 2015 from na­tions that breed ter­ror­ists. It was in­evitable that some would come to de­stroy rather than as­sim­i­late.

Mount­ing ev­i­dence that many of these peo­ple are time bombs wait­ing to ex­plode still fails to open eyes that have been de­lib­er­ately shut.

Take the case of a 24-year-old Tu­nisian named Anis Amri, the sus­pect in the Ber­lin Christ­mas mar­ket at­tack, shot dead by au­thor­i­ties on Fri­day in Mi­lan, Italy. Amri was one of a num­ber of sus­pected ter­ror­ists who have come from Tu­nisia, a coun­try that has re­port­edly sent more fight­ers to Syria than any other. The Char­lie Hebdo at­tacker was Tu­nisian, as was the man who drove a truck into a crowd in Nice on Bastille Day, killing 86 peo­ple. ISIS had urged sim­i­lar at­tacks be made and, ap­par­ently, the Ber­lin sus­pect obeyed.

The UK Daily Mail re­ports Amri was jailed four years ago in Italy for burn­ing down a school. He also was ar­rested three times in Ger­many be­fore giv­ing po­lice the slip ear­lier this month. Ger­man au­thor­i­ties re­port­edly were in touch with Tu­nisian of­fi­cials to get Amri a pass­port so he could be de­ported. But Tunis re­jected the re­quest, say­ing it had no record of his ever be­ing a ci­ti­zen.

Was this a lie, or was he a plant? We may never know.

Mrs. Merkel’s re­sponse to all of this is a case of too lit­tle, too late. She wants to ban Mus­lim women from wear­ing full-face veils. That is a po­lit­i­cal move, not a strate­gic one. It will not de­ter ter­ror­ists from their mis­sion, as more en­ter Ger­many hid­den among le­git­i­mate refugees.

Re­spond­ing to the lat­est ter­ror­ist at­tacks, Pres­i­dent-elect Don­ald Trump said he has been proved “100 per­cent cor­rect” when it comes to his plans to cur­tail Mus­lim im­mi­grants from na­tions that spawn ter­ror­ists. Given the num­ber al­ready in Europe or those who have been self-rad­i­cal­ized and al­lowed into the U.S., it may be too late.

The West can ei­ther ac­qui­esce or fight back. Mr. Trump wants to fight back. It’s bet­ter than wait­ing for the next at­tack, hop­ing we’re not the tar­get.

Mrs. Merkel’s re­sponse to all of this is a case of too lit­tle, too late. She wants to ban Mus­lim women from wear­ing full­face veils. That is a po­lit­i­cal move, not a strate­gic one. It will not de­ter ter­ror­ists from their mis­sion.

ILLLUSTRATION BY HUNTER

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