Baby in a jar

The Washington Times Daily - - METRO - RE­BECCA HAGELIN Re­becca Hagelin can be reached at re­becca@re­bec­c­a­hagelin.com.

Editor’s note: This is the sec­ond col­umn in a se­ries on the moral im­per­a­tive of de­fund­ing Planned Par­ent­hood.

‘There’s a jar on the shelf with a lit­tle baby in it!” the girl ner­vously whis­pered.

Sev­eral of us were gath­ered around one of the lab sta­tions in our sev­enth-grade science class when my wide-eyed class­mate re­vealed her grue­some dis­cov­ery.

Of course, we couldn’t be­lieve it. We all knew those crowded book­shelves in the far cor­ner of the room. They were filled with jars of frogs and snakes and other for­mer liv­ing things that now stood pre­served in some brown­ish-yel­low liq­uid, made cloudy and dense by their very slowly de­com­pos­ing bod­ies. Ev­ery spec­i­men had that same sick­en­ing hue, long void of life and what­ever color it once had.

A friend and I made our way to the back of the room amid the clink­ing of test tubes and may­hem while the class of 12-year-olds tried to or­ga­nize in lit­tle groups for the day’s lab ac­tiv­ity. The year was 1974.

It was a time when bun­son burn­ers, formalde­hyde, scalpels and pre­teens reg­u­larly in­ter­acted in public school science class­rooms.

It was also the year af­ter it be­came le­gal in Amer­ica to kill pre­born hu­man ba­bies — and put them in jars on dusty shelves along with mice and frogs.

Was it re­ally le­gal? You know, to kill a baby? To put it in a jar on a shelf? These ques­tions swamped my mind as I spot­ted the jar in dis­be­lief. Crammed in­side the pint-size tomb and im­mersed in that same sick­en­ing liq­uid was a per­fectly formed lit­tle baby. A hu­man baby.

Abor­tion was not dis­cussed in mid­dle school in those days. But our gen­tle, kind science teacher thought the truth about the prod­uct of abor­tion should be known. I re­mem­ber him softly say­ing “God rest his soul” as he joined us at the book­shelves in our silent con­tem­pla­tion. He didn’t need to ex­pound. He didn’t have to.

But to this day I wish I knew more about the help­less lit­tle baby whose life had been snuffed out. While oth­ers were pre­oc­cu­pied with where our teacher got the baby, I was struck by his dead still­ness. I mar­veled at his tiny toes and the per­fectly formed del­i­cate rib cage barely vis­i­ble through taut, translu­cent skin. And I had the un­shake­able feel­ing that his death was very, very wrong.

Some­thing is very, very wrong in a coun­try where lit­tle hu­man ba­bies con­tinue to be legally slaugh­tered. If more peo­ple saw their lit­tle bod­ies and wit­nessed that they are not form­less blobs of tis­sue as Planned Par­ent­hood tells young, un­sus­pect­ing moth­ers in the midst of emo­tional tur­moil, then per­haps our Amer­i­can holo­caust would fi­nally end.

But the truth is largely hid­den. Thank God the Cen­ter for Medical Progress (CMP) has bravely in­fil­trated Planned Par­ent­hood clin­ics and meet­ings over the last sev­eral years and care­fully doc­u­mented the grisly truth through un­der­cover videos.

Although Cal­i­for­nia’s at­tor­ney gen­eral, to whom Planned Par­ent­hood made nu­mer­ous cam­paign con­tri­bu­tions, re­cently charged the CMP ci­ti­zen jour­nal­ists with 15 crim­i­nal counts for al­legedly il­le­gally record­ing con­ver­sa­tions with em­ploy­ees of the baby abor­tu­ar­ies, many of the videos can be viewed at Cen­terForMed­i­calProgress.org.

The videos and hun­dreds of pages of doc­u­ments re­veal for all the world to see how Planned Par­ent­hood not only kills ba­bies but of­ten has them chopped into pieces and sold like chicken parts to those who traffic hu­man re­mains.

Oh, and if you are a tax­payer, you are help­ing to fund the atroc­i­ties.

Find out what you can do to help per­suade Congress to stop pay­ing Planned Par­ent­hood and to work to­ward pro­tect­ing the pre­born and their un­sus­pect­ing moms.

Visit Cen­terForMed­i­calProgress.org and click on “Take Ac­tion.”

Con­sider this col­umn your baby-ina-jar mo­ment.

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