Bombed broads aren’t sexy: Guys want girls to curb drink­ing

The Washington Times Weekly - - National - BY JEN­NIFER HARPER

The naughty ca­chet of “Girls Gone Wild” — ine­bri­ated co­eds on spring break — lost its lus­ter on March 9. That naughty ca­chet is a myth, es­sen­tially.

“When it comes to drink­ing, col­lege men are not looking for the girl gone wild,” said a new study from Loy­ola Mary­mount Uni­ver­sity in Los An­ge­les.

That’s not what the girls think, how­ever. Most are un­der the im­pres­sion that their male friends are more at­tracted to girls who have had a few, and then some.

“Our re­search sug­gests women be­lieve men find ex­ces­sive drink­ing sex­u­ally at­trac­tive and ap­peal­ing, but it ap­pears this is a gi­ant mis­per­cep­tion,” said lead au­thor Joseph LaBrie, an as­so­ciate pro­fes­sor of psy­chol­ogy at the cam­pus.

His study, based on a sur­vey of 3,616 stu­dents at his own school and the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton, found that 71 per­cent of the girls over­es­ti­mated the amount of al­co­hol that the typ­i­cal col­lege man hoped his girl­friend or date would con­sume. More than a fourth — 26 per­cent — thought the men­folk wanted their fe­male com­pan­ions to con­sume five drinks or more. That was not the case. “Both es­ti­mates were nearly dou­ble what the men ac­tu­ally pre­ferred,” said the study, which was pub­lished in Psy­chol­ogy of Ad­dic­tive Be­hav­iors, an aca­demic jour­nal of the Amer­i­can Psy­cho­log­i­cal As­so­ci­a­tion.

The young women drank “in pur­suit of in­ti­mate re­la­tion­ships and pos­i­tive at­ten­tion from their male peers,” the re­search found. It rec­om­mended that col­lege cam­puses and pub­lic health or­ga­ni­za­tions de­velop dis­tinctly “fe­male-tar­geted in­ter­ven­tions” to re­verse the trend.

“There is a great, and risky, dis­con­nect here be­tween the sexes,” said Mr. LaBrie. “While not all women may be drink­ing sim­ply to get a guy´s at­ten­tion, this study may help ex­plain why more women are drink­ing at dan- ger­ous lev­els.” They’re also drink­ing more. “Al­though tra­di­tion­ally, men drink more than women, re­search has shown that women have steadily been drink­ing more and more over the last sev­eral decades,” Mr. LaBrie said.

“Our re­search sug­gests women be­lieve men find ex­ces­sive drink­ing sex­u­ally at­trac­tive and ap­peal­ing, but it ap­pears this is a gi­ant mis­per­cep­tion,” said lead au­thor Joseph LaBrie, an as­so­ciate pro­fes­sor of psy­chol­ogy at Loy­ola Mar ymount Uni­ver­sity in Los An­ge­les.

In­deed, the fem­i­nine al­co­hol fac­tor is on the in­crease, ac­cord­ing to a num­ber of sources.

Binge drink­ing is up 22 per­cent in col­lege women — dou­ble the in­crease in men, ac­cord­ing to the Na­tional Cen­ter on Ad­dic­tion and Sub­stance Abuse at Colum- bia Uni­ver­sity. Women typ­i­cally con­sume 10 drinks a day dur­ing their spring-break fes­tiv­i­ties, said an­other study by the Jour­nal of Amer­i­can Col­lege Health.

Har­vard Uni­ver­sity’s School of Pub­lic Health is­sued a cau­tion to women in Oc­to­ber, not­ing that women were far more vul­ner­a­ble to al­co­hol than men be­cause of their me­tab­o­lism and phys­i­cal makeup — ad­vis­ing that men should have no more than two drinks a day, women just one.

The Amer­i­can Med­i­cal As­so­ci­a­tion has ad­vised col­lege cam­puses since 2006 to warn women about the haz­ards of spring break af­ter sur­vey­ing 644 young women to find that three-fourths of them “use drink­ing as an ex­cuse for ou­tra­geous be­hav­ior.”

Are they lis­ten­ing? Well, maybe not.

When po­lice broke up a re­cent party for 1,100 in a Florida bar organized by the “Girls Gone Wild” video pro­duc­tion com­pany, half of the eight ar­rests made that night were women.

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