Tow­son Uni­ver­sity po­lit­i­cal sci­ence pro­fes­sor and pres­i­den­tial his­to­rian Martha Joynt Ku­mar noted this use of the teleprompter “is just some­thing pres­i­dents haven’t done.” Un­til now.

The Washington Times Weekly - - Editorials -

the teleprompters aren’t block­ing pic­tures of the pres­i­dent and oth­ers.

Tow­son Uni­ver­sity po­lit­i­cal sci­ence pro­fes­sor and pres­i­den­tial his­to­rian Martha Joynt Ku­mar noted this use of the teleprompter “is just some­thing pres­i­dents haven’t done.” Un­til now.

Two weeks ago, Obama’s pre­sen­ta­tion of Kansas Gov. Kath­leen Se­be­lius as head of Health and Hu­man Ser­vices cre­ated an awk­ward si­lence be­tween the Obama and Se­be­lius pre­sen­ta­tions while he could use to an­swer ques­tions.” It quoted one Obama ad­vi­sor as say­ing that Mr. Obama is looking at in­stalling a com­puter screen in White House podi­ums so “it would make it eas­ier for the comms (com­mu­ni­ca­tions) guys to pass along in­for­ma­tion without be­ing ob­vi­ous about it.”

The no­tion that a com­puter tech­ni­cian is queu­ing up the pres­i­dent’s an­swers to ques­tions is dis­turb­ing. One can eas­ily imag­ine a Satur­day Night Live skit where a tech­ni­cian waits with a canned set of

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